Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write a python script for Sieve of Eratosthenes. I have everything done, but when I tell the program to test each number if it is a multiple of at least one of the prime numbers below the √input. It goes well but when I try to remove a multiple it works until it tries to delete 6 twice... I've been looking over my code and can't seem to find out why. I'm rather new to Python so help would be much appreciated! --- Note my code's spacing is off due to SOF's way of making code blocks:

import math, os, threading

global iswhole
global tdprime

def iswhole(x):
if x%1 == 0:
    return True
else:
    return False

def tdprime(x):
prime = True
n = 2

while n < x:
    if iswhole(x/n) == True:
        return False
        prime = False
        n = x
    else:
        n += 1

if prime == True:
    return True

number = 0

while number != 1:

number = int(input("Enter number to calculate all primes up to:  "))
number_range = range(1,number+1)
sqrt = math.sqrt(number)
rsqrt = round(sqrt)
thelist = []
tsl = []

for num in range(1,rsqrt):
    if tdprime(num) == True:
        tsl.append(num)
tsl.remove(1)

for x in number_range: ## Making the List
    thelist.append(x)
    ## Note it's " Key: Value " in dictionaries

print(tsl)
print("thelist: ",thelist)
print("Square root of input = ",sqrt)
print("Rounded Square root of input = ",rsqrt)
print()

for x in thelist: ## Testing each number in thelist

    multiple = False

    for y in tsl: ## Each prime number under √number

        if iswhole(x/y):
            print(x) ## If the current number in thelist divided by one of the prime numbers under √number is a whole
            thelist.remove(x)## Remove the current number which isn't a prime
            thelist.sort()
            multiple = True ## Make multiple true so it doesn't print (could remove the multiple stuff and other if function, kind of pointless function now)

    if multiple == False:
        print("Prime! ",x)


print(thelist)
share|improve this question
    
It is far easier to keep consistent spacing when posting to SO if you stick entirely to tabs or entirely to spaces in your source programs. Then you're free to just paste it in and use the code formatting button. (Or any other mechanism you please to add four spaces in front of each line.) Things go to hell in a hurry if your code mixes spaces and tabs freely. Please take the time to edit the post to reflect the actual spacing... –  sarnold Dec 14 '11 at 1:44
1  
Can you space the code properly? I can't see where one loops starts and another ends. –  Blender Dec 14 '11 at 1:44
    
Which Python version are you using? In Python 2, x/n is integer division if both x and n are integers (and thus iswhole(x/n) is always true) , while in Python 3, x/n is always floating point division, and x//n is integer division. –  Emil Lundberg Dec 14 '11 at 1:47
    
In other languages, messy spacing is irritating, but in Python it is a syntactic error. Please post code that runs, if possible. –  jforberg Dec 14 '11 at 2:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code can be much simplified by the following realisations:

  • The numbers up to a number n can easily be generated as needed, they don't have to be calculated berforehand and stored in a list.

  • 2 is the only even prime, so you only need to test odd numbers.

  • All numbers can be fully factorised into prime factors, uniquely (this is called the fundamental theorem of arithmetic). This means that the only numbers which you need to try dividing by are the primes you have previously calculated --- all other numbers will be divisible by at least one of those primes anyway (or they would be primes themselves).

Try something along these lines:

stop = int(input("Enter number to calculate all primes up to: "))

primes = []

for n in range(3, stop, 2): # Step by two each time
    was_prime = True # Needed to break out of nested loop
    for p in primes:
        if n % p == 0: # A prime divides n
             was_prime = False
             break # No need to continue
    if was_prime:
        primes.append(n)

print(primes) # You can insert the number 2 here if you like

Also, please pay attention to spacing and indentation. In Python, when you get your spacing wrong it is not only difficult to read, but a runtime error.

share|improve this answer
    
This is perhaps not a true Sieve of Eratosthenes, but a much more efficient algorithm and more instructive, I think. –  jforberg Dec 14 '11 at 2:12
    
Thanks a lot! I was surprised about how short your's is. I guess I was over complication mine a lot! The best part about yours is that it makes sense and is short! –  Clement Dec 14 '11 at 19:25
    
Alright I finally got back around to your code, but this time I made it a real Sieve of Eratosthenes since your code starts to slow down a lot with bigger numbers. Thank you so much for the example Jforberg! –  Clement Dec 16 '11 at 21:46
    
You're welcome! –  jforberg Dec 17 '11 at 1:29

I'm a little worried about your iswhole() function:

def iswhole(x):
    if x%1 == 0:
        return True
    else:
        return False

(Incidentally, this could be re-written as simply return (x%1 == 0) and skip the return True and return False pieces.)

Floating point numbers are odd creatures:

>>> 10.0%1
0.0
>>> (10.1 * 10)%1
0.0
>>> (10.01 * 100)%1
0.0
>>> (10.001 * 1000)%1
0.0
>>> (10.0001 * 10000)%1
0.0
>>> (10.00001 * 100000)%1
0.0
>>> (10.000001 * 1000000)%1
0.0
>>> (10.0000001 * 10000000)%1
0.0
>>> (10.00000001 * 100000000)%1
1.1920928955078125e-07

For an input such as 6, this doesn't seem likely to be the problem, but it might become a problem for larger inputs. Comparing floating point numbers is troublesome.

For the 6 problem, I'd like to suggest that instead of a mutable list to keep track of your data, you might wish to use an array instead. The array never needs to be sorted (the fact that you have a sort() in your program smells a bit like trying to paper over some kind of bug) and deleting elements from the middles of lists is often extremely expensive. (That sort pretty much means your performance is going to be poor anyhow. Not a big deal for small inputs, but try 1000000 as a starting point.) Setting elements in an array to 1 or 0 is almost always far cheaper than mutable lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, thank you guys! The first one helped me understand why and sarnold that will help me with performance. I'm still getting used to python and making it efficient. I already have trail division but Lists/Dicts get confusing rather fast. –  Clement Dec 14 '11 at 2:08

I see a problem with this bit:

for x in thelist: ## Testing each number in thelist

    multiple = False

    for y in tsl: ## Each prime number under √number

        if iswhole(x/y):
            print(x) ## If the current number in thelist divided by one of the prime numbers under √number is a whole
            thelist.remove(x)## Remove the current number which isn't a prime
            thelist.sort()

You call thelist.remove(x) and thelist.sort() while iterating over thelist. You generally don't want to modify a structure you're iterating over in Python. It usually confuses the internal machinery doing the iteration; you get symptoms like mysteriously skipping elements or processing them twice, or other weirdness.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.