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I've written a program to accept TCP socket connections (server and client code below) for a Linux 2.6.14 machine. My design is meant to ignore some (socket) inputs and respond to others. Problem is, for the code I've written, when I ignore (don't respond), my select(2) function doesn't see any more data.

So in the example below, as soon as I send a t command, the server seems to stop hearing action on the port instance. Up to the point I send a t command, the server will respond with its Ok.. The server code isn't frozen as it will accept new port instances and fork(2), but the port that it hasn't responded to the t (test) command remains seemingly frozen. Why is this?

here is my attempt at useful captured output ...

~/test$ ./client-test 192.168.20.171 48884

Ok.  
Ok.
Ok.t






^Z
[1]+  Stopped                 ./client-test 192.168.20.171 48884
~/test$ ./client-test 192.168.20.171 48884

Ok.
Ok.

Here is the code for my server (error code and #includes removed):

#define PORT_NUM 48884
#define CLIENT_CMD_LENGTH  256
static void dostuff(int fd)
{
    char buf[CLIENT_CMD_LENGTH];
    char bye[] = "Bye!", ok[] = "Ok.";
    const struct timeval wait_tv = { .tv_usec = 1000000/20, .tv_sec = 0 };
    fd_set read_fd;

    do
    {
        struct timeval tv;
        int n;

        tv = wait_tv;
        FD_ZERO( & read_fd);

        FD_SET(fd, &read_fd);
        if (select(fd+1, &read_fd, NULL, NULL, &tv)==-1)
        {
            /* error */
        }
        else if (FD_ISSET(fd, & read_fd))
        {
            printf(".\n");
            FD_CLR(fd, & read_fd);
            n = read(fd,buf, (sizeof buf) - 1);

            switch (* buf)
            {
                case 'q': write(fd,bye,sizeof bye);
                          return;
                case 't': break; /* Ignore */
                default:  write(fd, ok, sizeof ok);
                          break;
            }
        }
    } while (1);
    return;
}

static void server_work(void)
{
     int sockfd;
     socklen_t clilen;
     struct sockaddr_in serv_addr, cli_addr;

     sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
     if (sockfd < 0) return;
     memset((char *) &serv_addr, '\0', sizeof(serv_addr));
     serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
     serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
     serv_addr.sin_port = htons(PORT_NUM);
     if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0) {
          return;
     }
     listen(sockfd,5);
     clilen = sizeof(cli_addr);
     while (1) {
        int newsockfd, pid;
         newsockfd = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &cli_addr, &clilen);
         if (newsockfd < 0)
             continue;
         pid = fork();
         if (pid < 0)
             break;
         if (pid == 0)  {
             close(sockfd);
             dostuff(newsockfd);
             exit(0);
         }
         else close(newsockfd);
     } /* end of while */
     close(sockfd);
     return; /* we never get here */
}

int main( int argc, char *argv[] ) {
    server_work();
    return 0;
}

and my test client ...

void error(const char *msg)
{
    perror(msg);
    exit(0);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int sockfd, portno, n;
    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr;
    struct hostent *server;

    char buffer[256];
    if (argc < 3) {
       fprintf(stderr,"usage %s hostname port\n", argv[0]);
       exit(0);
    }
    portno = atoi(argv[2]);
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (sockfd < 0)
        error("ERROR opening socket");
    server = gethostbyname(argv[1]);
    if (server == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr,"ERROR, no such host\n");
        exit(0);
    }
    bzero((char *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr));
    serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    bcopy((char *)server->h_addr,
         (char *)&serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr,
         server->h_length);
    serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno);
    if (connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr,sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0)
        error("ERROR connecting");
    do {
    bzero(buffer,256);
    fgets(buffer,255,stdin);
    n = write(sockfd,buffer,strlen(buffer));
    if (n < 0)
         error("ERROR writing to socket");
    bzero(buffer,256);
    n = read(sockfd,buffer,255);
    if (n < 0)
         error("ERROR reading from socket");
    printf("%s",buffer);
    } while (*buffer != 'B');
    close(sockfd);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you see happening when you walk through the code with the select()? Does your code hang, or does it continue? Does the select timeout until t is received??? –  M.Babcock Dec 14 '11 at 3:03
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is because your client blocks on reading right after it does its write, while the server does not send anything back on receiving a t and just goes back to select(2). Classic deadlock.

Either skip reading on the client after sending commands that server ignores, or always send some sort of an ack from the server.

Side note - you assume that receiver gets same exact chunk of data that the sender sends. Wrong. TCP is a byte stream and does not preserve any sort of application-level message boundaries. You have to worry about those yourself. Two common ways of dealing with it are 1) message delimiters like zero-byte or something, and 2) pre-pending each message with its size.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it will. I'll test it by adding a select call on the client side ... as for the read lengths I get those using a ioctl(fd, FIONREAD, (void*)&nbytes) call and a message size. Thanks. –  Jamie Dec 14 '11 at 12:49
    
Adding a select(2) to the client test code did help. Thanks. –  Jamie Dec 14 '11 at 13:22
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