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I'm trying to convert a column in my Rails app, for arguments sake let's pretend I'm trying to change the age column in my users table to a string representation rather than an int.

In my migration I have this;

def.self up
    add_column :users, :age_text, :string

    users = User.find(:all)

    users.each do |u|
       u.age_text = convert_to_text(u.age)
       u.save
    end
end

def self.convert_to_text(number)
   #code here to convert 1 to 'one' etc
end

But it doesn't seem to be working, is what I'm attempting here even possible with migrations?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 45 down vote accepted

What you're trying to do is possible, and I would say the correct thing to do.

You need, though, to reload the column info for the model classes you're updating in the migration, so that Rails knows about the new columns. Try this:

def.self up
    add_column :users, :age_text, :string

    User.reset_column_information 

    users = User.find(:all)

    users.each do |u|
       u.age_text = convert_to_text(u.age)
       u.save
    end
end

On a separate note, please note that if your table is large, doing updates one by one will take a looong time.. Be careful with that.

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1  
What would be a better way? –  Kirschstein May 11 '09 at 22:59
    
Depends on what you're trying to do.. If it's a simple update that needs to be done, you could simply run a SQL command with the execute method (execute 'update user set colA = 1'). Again, just be careful; if you have 10k users in the Users table, looping thru each of them with the migration above will likely take a long time. –  Eduardo Scoz May 12 '09 at 3:06
1  
Sometimes you will need to this as well User.connection.schema_cache.clear! –  jackquack May 17 '13 at 19:02
2  
for large tables you can use batched jobs guides.rubyonrails.org/… –  bruThaler Oct 24 '13 at 8:18

Since I'm new here I can't comment on the above so I'll add my own answer.

GENERALLY manipulating data in migrations is a BAD idea. Migrations with direct model access can get stuck if the model logic changes.

Imagine in your second migration you've added a new column. You want to seed that column with new data.

Let's also say a few weeks later you add a new validation to the model - a validation that operates on a field that does not yet exist in your second migration. if you ever were to construct the database from migration 0, you'd have some problems.

I strongly suggest using migrations to alter columns and other means to manage database data, especially when moving to production.

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Hmm, very good point. With this in mind, how do you handle converting data? –  Kirschstein May 14 '09 at 16:32
1  
I make a rake task. It's easier, and actually easier to test too, even if I throw it away after I use it. –  Brian Hogan May 14 '09 at 16:41
2  
Is there a way to ensure that your rake tasks are run in the correct sequence, along with migrations then? What if a migration made after this one then drops of the obsolete column before the rake task is run? –  Kirschstein May 14 '09 at 16:51
7  
It's an unlikely situation. You generally have your rake tasks run after all your migrations are made, and you generally never re-run migrations on databases with actual data on them. Once you've 'fixed' your data, you don't 'need' to go back to 0 to fix that again. New developers, and new production boxes, are encouraged to create the database with rake db:schema:load instead, which is fast, and immediately builds the most recent db. Data conversions have, for me, been a 'one-off' thing. You convert the data and move forward. –  Brian Hogan May 16 '09 at 1:30
2  
I think migrations are the proper place for this to happen, but in order to do it right you need a git hook that, for each revision, will apply the changes and then run bundle exec rake db:migrate before moving onto the next revision. Perhaps we'll see this integration with git eventually built into rake/rails/heroku/etc. –  coreyward Sep 30 '11 at 17:44

Here is an example migration I ran to convert data. You can easily convert it to use integers instead of strings. Making the conversion in SQL is much faster than loading each row in Rails.

class ConvertCommentTextToText < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    add_column :comments, :text_tmp, :text
    # copy text column
    execute <<-SQL
      update comments set text_tmp = text
    SQL
    remove_column :comments, :text
    rename_column :comments, :text_tmp, :text
  end

  def down
    add_column :comments, :text_tmp, :string
    # copy text column
    execute <<-SQL
      update comments set text_tmp = text
    SQL
    remove_column :comments, :text
    rename_column :comments, :text_tmp, :text
  end

end

And to test it:

rake db:migrate
rake db:rollback
rake db:migrate
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I would say that if you can "undo" the imported data when rolling back the migration version, then it's appropriate to put imports into the migration.

For example, I have a migration which sets up a lot of lookup tables and other meta-data. The data for these tables are populated during this phase. As the data for these lookup tables changes, I create new YAML files storing the meta-data and load those files in subsequent migrations (and un-do those YAMLS, re-loading the previous YAML file when backing out of a migration version). This is pretty clean. I have files (in different well-defined folders in my case) with these files:

002_setup_meta_data.rb
002_meta_data.yaml


007_change_meta_data.rb
007_meta_data.yaml

If you're importing "production" data from another system into transactional (non-static) tables, then I would say using migrations is not appropriate. Then I would follow Brian Hogan's advice of using rake tasks.

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