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I would really like to load a background image before images within the page.

See: http://carolineelisa.com/boy/animation/, where I want the paper image to load before the animated gifs.

Can this be achieved via CSS or would it be a bit of Javascript or jQuery?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Granted: this isn't foolproof, and results may vary in some browsers, but it should deliver satisfactory results in most cases.

<img id="bg_preload" src="path/to/image.jpg" style="position: absolute; top: -9999px;"/>
<img id="fg_1" class="fg_image" src="" style="visibility: hidden;"/>
<img id="fg_2" class="fg_image" src="" style="visibility: hidden;"/>
<img id="fg_3" class="fg_image" src="" style="visibility: hidden;"/>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $('#bg_preload').load(function() 
    {
        $('.fg_image').each(function() 
        {
            this.src = 'path/to/image.gif';
            this.style.visibility = 'visible';
        });
    });
</script>
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Cool! Thanks Aaron, it seems to work for me. Any chance you could you point me in the right direction for setting the image sources in one line? For now I have: $("#cloud1").attr('src', 'cloud1.gif'); $("#cloud2").attr('src', 'cloud2.gif'); $("#dolphin1").attr('src', 'dolphin1.gif'); $("#dolphin2").attr('src', 'dolphin2.gif'); But obviously I'd like to specify the image id plus '.gif' as the source... –  Caroline Elisa Dec 14 '11 at 3:47
    
You might try creating an array (e.g: srcArray[]) with each source string, then, in $('.imgClass').each(function(index)), set this.src = srcArray[index];. You just need to make sure that the order of your array corresponds with the order of your each() iteration. –  Aaron Dec 14 '11 at 3:54

Consider adding the animated GIFs into the DOM after the document is ready.

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This doesn't necessarily mean the background (css) image is done being loaded (or is loaded at all). Using the onload of an image (to said resource) could ensure the browser cache was primed, but there be other assumptions and issues with that. –  user166390 Dec 14 '11 at 2:55

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