Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are all of the components the same size for each system's LookAndFeel?

UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName();

If not, what layout type is the best to deal with having components being different sizes on each system?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
Recommended read: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/layout/using.html –  OscarRyz Dec 14 '11 at 3:15
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You ask:

Are all of the components the same size for each system's LookAndFeel?

No, they are not the all the same size.

If not, what layout type is the best to deal with having components being different sizes on each system?

There is no one layout that works best for all, and so this question is not easily answered in a few words. Your best off nesting containers, each using its own layout, and making sure that the layouts work well when resized. Your best off letting components chose their own preferred size and packing your GUI before displaying it.

I find that mixing the basic and simple layouts works best for me, including using BorderLayout, BoxLayout, GridLayout, FlowLayout, and occasionally GridBagLayout. I have found that the NetBean's default GroupLayout is the least flexible of all for this sort of problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I've never used containers before. Do you have any links that explain them well? –  Stripies Dec 14 '11 at 3:23
3  
@JonMannerberg: Actual, you have. Anything that descends from Container is a Container. This includes JComponent and all its descendants, many of which I'm sure you've used quite a bit such as JPanels, JButtons, JLabels, etc... This also includes top-level windows such as JFrames, JApplets, JDialogs,... –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 14 '11 at 3:34
add comment

If not, what layout type is the best to deal with having components being different sizes on each system?

In general, I think you are concerned about a "best single choice" here. In that case , I would suggest the METAL look and feel --- in general , the os specific looks are quirky on different systems... If you are pushing Swing to the limit, with complex forms, etc, you will find that the regular, old-school, applet style look and feel is the best to go with.

Now, regarding layouts :

The Flow and Grid layouts are some of the most robust ... I don't recall any surprises with these, but ... they are boring.

Then, there is the BoxLayout which, when coupled with tabbed panes, can give you a very robust, cross platform, expandable gui (this is very well complimented by JScrollPanes).

The GridBagLayout is also robust IF YOU UNDERSTAND HOW IT WORKS

Finally, there are the newer open source, non Sun layout managers, like GridLayout2, and some of the netbeans moeiteys. These are extremely convenient at the beggining, but I would be careful with them if you are deploying on a lot of platforms.

I find that the standard swing layouts are good at dealing with the different default component sizes, as long as the pack() and revalidate() methods are appropriately used when necessary. If your GUI is particularly dynamic, the revalidate() method is very important .

share|improve this answer
2  
Lacking the ability to properly lay out a GUI, is a poor excuse for using the Metal PLAF. –  Andrew Thompson Dec 14 '11 at 3:50
1  
But some good suggestions nevertheless -- except the recommendation to use metal (but that's my subjective opinion). Myself, I much prefer the Nimbus layout, but again, the key is to use layout managers properly so as to create a GUI that works and looks somewhat pleasing no matter what layout manager is used. up-vote +1. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 14 '11 at 3:57
    
When I use pack() and FlowLayout, it makes everything go onto one line. –  Stripies Dec 14 '11 at 3:59
    
@JonMannerberg: then you're not using the layout managers correctly. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 14 '11 at 4:00
1  
Wow... This has really turned into a controversial answer ....ha .. Anyways.... I find that metal is the least aesthetically pleasing but the most robust. but it's true that this is more a heuristic then anything else. –  jayunit100 Dec 14 '11 at 4:07
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.