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I am learning boost::asio and C++11 simultaneously. One of my test programs, which is actually an adaptation of one of the samples given in the boost::asio tutorial is the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

class printer {

// Static data members
private:
    const static boost::posix_time::seconds one_second;

// Instance data members
private:
    boost::asio::deadline_timer timer;
    int count;

// Public members
public:
    printer(boost::asio::io_service& io)
        : timer(io, one_second), count(0) {

        std::function<void(const boost::system::error_code&)> callback;
        callback = [&](const boost::system::error_code&) { // critical line
            if (count < 5) {
                std::cout << "Current count is " << count++ << std::endl;

                timer.expires_at(timer.expires_at() + one_second);
                timer.async_wait(callback);
            }
        };

        timer.async_wait(callback);
    }

    ~printer() {
        std::cout << "Final count is " << count << std::endl;
    }
};

const boost::posix_time::seconds printer::one_second(1);

int main() {
    boost::asio::io_service io;
    printer p(io);
    io.run();

    return 0;
}

When I run this program, I get a segmentation fault. I do understand why I get the segmentation fault. After the constructor is done running, the constructor's callback variable goes out of scope, and the lambda's callback variable, which is a reference to the constructor's callback variable, becomes a dangling reference.

So I modify the critical line with:

        callback = [callback, &](const boost::system::error_code&) { // critical line

Then compile it, run it, and get a bad function call error. Again, I do understand why I get the bad function call error. Within the lambda's scope, the constructor's callback variable has still not been assigned any value to, so it for all practical purposes is a dangling function pointer. Hence, the lambda's callback variable, which is a copy of the constructor's callback variable, is also a dangling function pointer.


After thinking about this problem for a while, I realized that what I truly need is that the callback be able to refer to itself using a function pointer, not a reference to a function pointer. The sample achieved this by using a named function as callback, instead of an anonymous one. However, passing named functions as callbacks is not very elegant. Is there any way to get an anonymous function have a function pointer to itself as a local variable?

share|improve this question

There are several alternatives:

  • Stop using a lambda. You don't have to use them for everything, you know. They cover a lot of cases, but they don't cover everything. Just use a regular old functor.
  • Have the lambda store a smart pointer to a dynamically allocated std::function that stores the lambda. For example:

    auto pCallback = std::make_shared<std::function<void(const boost::system::error_code&)>>();
    auto callback = [=](const boost::system::error_code&) { // critical line
        if (count < 5) {
            std::cout << "Current count is " << count++ << std::endl;
    
            timer.expires_at(timer.expires_at() + one_second);
            timer.async_wait(pCallback.get());
        }
    };
    *pCallback = callback;
    
share|improve this answer
    
Using a functor would be exactly the same as using a named function. The functor's name would be, in essence, the function's true name. // Besides, if I am going to use a functor anyway, then why not make the printer class the functor itself? – pyon Dec 14 '11 at 5:46
1  
@EduardoLeón: As I said, Lambdas aren't for everything. Sometimes, you accept the limitations you have and work within them. Or you can just do the other thing I said. Personally, the fact that you'd have to use a pointer method like this strongly suggests that you should probably use the clearer and more obvious functor methodology. At least with that, it's obvious what's going on. – Nicol Bolas Dec 14 '11 at 5:50

To learn about Asio and C++11 I recommend the boostcon talk "Why C++0x is the Awesomest Language for Network Programming" by the designer of asio himself. (Christopher Kohlhoff)

https://blip.tv/boostcon/why-c-0x-is-the-awesomest-language-for-network-programming-5368225 http://github.com/chriskohlhoff/awesome

In this talk, C.K takes a typical small asio application and start to add C++11 feature one by one. There is a part about lambda around the middle of the talk. The kind of issue you have with life-time of lambda is workaround by using the following pattern :

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>
#include <memory>

class printer 
{

// Static data members
private:
    const static boost::posix_time::seconds one_second;

// Instance data members
private:
    boost::asio::deadline_timer timer;
    int count;

// Public members
public:
    printer(boost::asio::io_service& io)
        : timer(io, one_second), count(0) {
       wait();
    }

    void wait() {
        timer.async_wait(
            [&](const boost::system::error_code& ec) {
               if (!ec && count < 5) {
                 std::cout << "Current count is " << count++ << std::endl;

                 timer.expires_at(timer.expires_at() + one_second);
                 wait();
               }
            });
    }

    ~printer() {
        std::cout << "Final count is " << count << std::endl;
    }
};

const boost::posix_time::seconds printer::one_second(1);

int main() {
    boost::asio::io_service io;
    printer p(io);
    io.run();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't technically answer the question, but it does solve the problem. +1. – Nicol Bolas Dec 15 '11 at 19:38

Only theory: you can do such things with what is called combinators (like I, S, K).

Before using your anonymous lambda expression e of type F, you can first define functions like doubleF ; (F) -> (F, F) or applyToOneself : (F f) -> F = { return f(f); }.

share|improve this answer

There is now a proposal to add a Y-combinator to the C++ standard library (P0200R0) to solve exactly this problem.

The basic idea here is that you pass the lambda to itself as a first argument. An invisible helper class takes care of the recursive call in the background by storing the lambda in a named member.

The sample implementation from the proposal looks like this:

#include <functional>
#include <utility>

namespace std {

template<class Fun>
class y_combinator_result {
    Fun fun_;
public:
    template<class T>
    explicit y_combinator_result(T &&fun): fun_(std::forward<T>(fun)) {}

    template<class ...Args>
    decltype(auto) operator()(Args &&...args) {
        return fun_(std::ref(*this), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }
};

template<class Fun>
decltype(auto) y_combinator(Fun &&fun) {
    return y_combinator_result<std::decay_t<Fun>>(std::forward<Fun>(fun));
}

} // namespace std

Which could be used as follows to solve the problem from the question:

timer.async_wait(std::y_combinator([](auto self, const boost::system::error_code&) {
    if (count < 5) {
        std::cout << "Current count is " << count++ << std::endl;

        timer.expires_at(timer.expires_at() + one_second);
        timer.async_wait(self);
    }
}));

Note the self argument that is being passed into the lambda. This will be bound to the result of the y_combinator call, which is a function object that is equivalent to the lambda with the self argument already bound (ie. its signature is void(const boost::system::error_code&)).

share|improve this answer
    
Useful, but really ugly. Manually tying fixpoints shouldn't be a thing. – pyon Feb 23 at 18:15

The lambda is capturing by-reference the local variable "callback", when the lambda runs that will not be valid.

share|improve this answer
1  
I very clearly stated I do understand why my program does not work. I want to know how a lambda could have a function pointer to itself (that lasts forever) instead of a reference to a function pointer to itself (that could become a dangling reference once the actual function pointer variable goes out of scope). – pyon Dec 14 '11 at 5:39
    
OK, I thought the solution was somewhat clear when stripping it down to the principle of why it doesn't work. Have you tried making "callback" a member of the class? – Adam Mitz Dec 14 '11 at 12:40

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