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If I want to write a Caesar cipher C# do I have to go through every case? It doesn't make sense to me to convert to ASCII or UTF (probably because I don't understand how it would work). I just need a point in the right direction.

Should I assign each letter the numbers 1-26?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could put each letter into an array and use the array index (wrapping at the end) or you could simply use the asccii value of the letter and wrap to the first when reaching the last. The trick here is that all the characters are coninuously sorted, starting at A=0x41

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Thank you! This makes sense to me, I didn't realise I could do that (I am a complete beginner!). –  The_Cthulhu_Kid Dec 14 '11 at 8:58

Perhaps dropping hints would be helpful - you say you don't want to copy or be told the answer:

  • Consider that C# features the modulus operator, in the form a = b % c - that is, remainder of b divided by c. When c = n and b = n, a = 0. When c = n and b = n+1, a = 1. Experiment with the behaviour of this operator.
  • You can declare arrays statically in C# with initialisers: char[] chars = new char[]{'a', 'b',...};
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Also a great help, thank you! –  The_Cthulhu_Kid Dec 14 '11 at 9:06

For a traditional Caesar Cypher, you'd check a char was in the range [a-z] or [A-Z], and just pass it plain otherwise.

An alternative is to treat all characters in the same way, so not only does a become b, but µ becomes ¶ and you wrap around at U+10FFFF (the highest codepoint in Unicode) becomes U+0000 (the former is a non-character and the latter a null character, but there's no reason why a string can't hold them to transmit to another place.

In between those two, is to act on the UTF-16. That is, you just add 1 to the value of each char, and wrap U+FFFF through to U+0000. The output could become an invalid UTF-16 string (because it could have mis-matched surrogates, but that wouldn't prevent you from passing it around in a string, and then decyphering it again. After all, modern encryption doesn't result in valid strings either.

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This is what I don't understand, if I want to decode a simple sentence and I convert it to code can I limit the range so that when I want 'z' to be 'b' for example, do I always have to go back and forth can I not make it analogous to a wheel? And thanks for the answer. –  The_Cthulhu_Kid Dec 14 '11 at 8:56
    
That's a matter of the spec rather than the work (sadly, most real-life complications are like this too, the programming is easier than working out what the client really wants). I'd say the first is probably what was intended. What do you mean by "not analogous to a wheel", any variant of a Caesar cypher is analogous to a wheel. –  Jon Hanna Dec 14 '11 at 9:01
    
I meant wrapping - as I found out from another answer =) - I should have written can't I make it analogous. I am still getting used to the terms. –  The_Cthulhu_Kid Dec 14 '11 at 9:11
1  
I was just not getting your wording. The problem with any Q/A is that one can mis-guess which bits the querent already knows perfectly, which bits they don't know, and which bits they are mistaken on, and answer a slightly different question to what they actually want :( –  Jon Hanna Dec 14 '11 at 9:53
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Totally. Besides the more wider-ranging answers covering several different cases are more fun to write. I wouldn't bother otherwise ;) –  Jon Hanna Dec 14 '11 at 10:34

This is my approach.

    public static string Encrypt(string str, int n)
    {
        return string.Join("", str.Select(x => Encrypt(x, n)));
    }

    public static string Decrypt(string str, int n)
    {
        return string.Join("", str.Select(x => Decrypt(x, n)));
    }

    public static char Encrypt(char chr, int n)
    {
        int x = chr - 65;

        return (char)((65) + ((x + n) % 26));
    }

    public static char Decrypt(char chr, int n)
    {
        int x = chr - 65;

        return (char)((65) + ((x - n) % 26));
    }

P.S.

Works only for uppercase letters.

Read the Wikipedia article: Caesar cipher

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