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I often see constructors like this

public class A {

   private int b;

   public A(int b) {
      setB(b);
   }

   public void setB(int b) {
      this.b = b;
   }
}

Is this a good idea? Should I use setter methods in the constructor? Isn't it a problem if I would override either the constructor or the setter methods in a sub class?

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constructor only use for initiate variable. it is not a good idea to call any method through constructor. –  Ashish Dec 14 '11 at 9:01
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3 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

It's probably not a good idea. If you don't make that class final and don't make the setName( ... ) method private or final someone else is able to extend your class and overrid the setName( ... ) method. Your constructor (in your base class) will call that method in the extending class instead of your implementation. Nobody knows what that method can do. As a rule of thumb: a constructor shouldn't call methods that can be overriden.

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4  
It's not only that: in the call of setName(), the subclass constructor hasn't yet been called, so final variables can be uninitialized, etc. –  artbristol Dec 14 '11 at 9:09
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I think you should chose carefully and be aware of the downsides of each.

If the class you are defining is likely to be sub-classed then take particular care to avoid being uninitialised at a time when the subclass needs you to be complete.

This may be a useful mechanism but it is, in my opinion, unpleasant.

public class A {

   private int b;

   public A(int b) {
      _setB(b);
   }

   private void _setB(int b) {
      this.b = b;
   }

   public void setB(int b) {
      _setB(b);
   }
}

I personally would prefer that to something like this though:

public class A {

   private int b;

   public A(int b) {
      this.b = b;
   }

   public void setB(int b) {
      this.b = b;
   }
}
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I think it is a good idea. I believe that it is a good practice to have one and only one point in your program where you assign value to bean property. This simplifies debugging. If for example you want to to who does assign wrong value to your property you have to put breakpoint in one place only.

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you can create object of class and call setter method to set data, and you can also put break point at the place where that object will create. –  Ashish Dec 14 '11 at 9:06
    
put a break point? What do you mean with that? –  RoflcoptrException Dec 14 '11 at 9:11
    
@Ashish, I can put several breakpoints but it is annoying and error prone. Class can have several constructors, so I have to put several break points. I want one. –  AlexR Dec 14 '11 at 9:23
    
@Roflcoptr, breakpoint is a common debugger feature that allows to stop program execution at specific point (breakpoit) and examine the program state. –  AlexR Dec 14 '11 at 9:24
    
Yes I know, but why should I use that in this case? –  RoflcoptrException Dec 14 '11 at 9:25
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