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What is the best way, during a recursive call, to either get or calculate the available remaining stack memory in Java?

(I'm trying to segment a deep recursive call to use as much of the stack as possible (for the sake of speed performance) but without hitting stack overflow.

I've already done a "heap" version, which carried a speed performance overhead, which is why I'm doing this optimization.)

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5 Answers 5

What for do you need it? Just curiosity? What is the units of measure - bytes or number of recursive invocations?

You can always make infinite recursive call, catch StackOverflowError and count stack frames

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Nope I'm trying to segment a deep recursive call to use as much of the stack as possible but without hitting stack overflow. Bytes would be fine although number of remaining recursive invocations would be even better! I don't mind having to calculate it if it's not immediately available. –  Navigateur Dec 14 '11 at 13:40

There is no way to do this in a portable manner.

Not only this is OS-specific, in practice the maximum size of the stack is subject to multiple constraints (ulimit -c, the amount of available virtual memory, -Xss and -XX:ThreadStackSize settings etc). This makes it hard to know which constraint will be hit first, even if you could reliably measure how much stack space has been consumed so far.

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Ok I don't mind taking the lowest of those values to be on the safe side. Can the Xss value never be 100% relied upon? Have you used the java.lang.management package and can attest that nothing in it allows calculation of current stack usage and/or remaining stack space? –  Navigateur Dec 14 '11 at 14:18

Hmmm. If you're worried, you could always keep a depth counter as part of your recursion.

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Unfortunately the input to the recursive call won't always be the same, so a counter wouldn't allow me to estimate how many more calls I could do before hitting stack overflow. –  Navigateur Dec 14 '11 at 14:03
    
@Navigateur Could you elaborate on "the input to the recursive call won't always be the same" ? Since the number of local variables are known ahead of time, how could you not know? –  Pacerier Jan 29 '12 at 14:40
    
It accepts Object as input, and goes through it by reflection, so it could be any type, and thus any size or depth in each case. –  Navigateur Feb 2 '12 at 18:24

I would write the method to be less recursive. Often there are ways to make less (or no) recursive calls.

If you sum a list recursively, adding the first value to the sum of the rest, this will make calls to a depth of N. However, if you cut the list in half and sum the values. (return the value if only one in the list) the recursive depth is log2(N).

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I have already done this. But now, for the sake of performance, I want to optimize it to use as much of the call stack as possible without hitting stack overflow, which is why I need the best available approximation of the remaining stack space. –  Navigateur Dec 14 '11 at 13:49
    
Just to be clear, the non-recursive version carried a speed performance overhead, which is why I'm doing this optimization. –  Navigateur Dec 14 '11 at 14:08
    
Why would using the whole call stack improve performance? Often changing an algorithm to be non-recursive improves performance. Calls can be relatively expensive. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 15 '11 at 8:05
    
It would add too much code complexity for me to reduce the actual number of calls because it's an indirect recursion which takes different paths depending on the input. So factoring out the recursion (to avoid stack overflow) simply adds the overhead of transferring things from the stack to the heap. So the pure stack version is about 1.3 - 2 times as fast, which is why this optimization is my only convenient option. If I could poll or calculate the amount of stack space remaining, the code change I would need is trivial. –  Navigateur Dec 15 '11 at 13:02
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There might be a way to avoid having to call it very often. You could have an attribute which records the depth and a field when records known safe depth. If you exceed the known safe depth, only then perform the test. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 21 '11 at 10:35

I'm surprised that the iterative approach is less performant. Generally the recursive approach would be slower due to the overhead of method calls. If your algorithm can be implemented as tail-recursive it almost certainly would be faster as an iterative implementation. Can you tell us more about what you're actually trying to do? Perhaps the difference in performance is more algorithmic than just switching iteration for recursion. Here is an example from some CS lecture notes that references a recursive approach to calculating Fibonacci numbers that is O(2^n) whereas the iterative approach is O(n). I believe (although I haven't tried) it is possible to write a recursive Fibonacci number generator that is O(n).

Edit:

One final thought. IMHO it would be much better to use a slower approach that is free of the problems of stack overflow, than introduce all the complexity of trying to determine that you're about to overflow the stack and have some fallback mechanism to avoid it.

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I can't avoid the overhead of method calls, because it is an indirect recursion which takes different paths depending on the input. So factoring out the recursion only adds the overhead of transferring things from the stack to the heap. This is up to around 2 times slower, when it is functionally identical. If I had amount of stack space left, I could use the stack up to its limit, and recoup a significant amount of this cost, without hitting stack overflow. This is trivial in code, which just needs to switch between the recursive and put-on-heap versions, which I already have. –  Navigateur Dec 15 '11 at 12:29

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