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Can someone help me explain why:

#id .classname

is worse than:

#id element.classname

from a rendering/performance perspective?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because the DOM has special functions (getElementByTagName) dedicated to find all elements in a tree by their tag name. These functions use lookup tables and are well optimized. No such method exist for classnames, however, and finding a classname requires to iterate through all the tree(s) and check existing classnames. This algorithm can be made quicker by reducing the size of the trees to iterate, and using an element. prefix does just this: it reduces the size of the trees to look for the classname.

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1  
But the browser doesn't look up elements to apply each CSS rule to, it checks which rules apply to each element... –  Guffa Dec 14 '11 at 13:18
    
@solendil: Then why does code.google.com/intl/es-ES/speed/page-speed/docs/rendering.html say, "Remove redundant qualifiers. These qualifiers are redundant: * ID selectors qualified by class and/or tag selectors, * Class selectors qualified by tag selectors (when a class is only used for one tag, which is a good design practice anyway)." Specifically, the second bullet point. –  Jason T Featheringham Dec 14 '11 at 13:22
    
@Jason: for ID it's obvious, IDs are supposed to be unique, so they're in a lookup map and any subsequent selector does not help. For classes, I suppose that when a class is used only by one tag, the rendering engine manages some optimizations on it... But then specifying the element should not slow it down... Anyway I suppose all this is very browser dependant, so as a rule of thumb, using IDs and elements is generally more efficient than classes, and combining selectors degrade performance. –  solendil Dec 14 '11 at 13:32
    
-1 This answer is not at all relevant to the question, because there is no element lookup when CSS rules are applied. The browser check which rules apply to an element, not which elements a rule applies to. –  Guffa Dec 15 '11 at 9:38
    
@Guffa: "not at all relevant" might be a bit excessive. Even if the rendering process of browsers work the other way round, using a CSS selector after the rendering pass (which is quite common with jQuery, for example) leads to the performance considerations exposed in this answer. –  solendil Dec 15 '11 at 9:57

simply because .classname has to check all elements for the specifyed classname, while type.classname only hast to check elements matching the specified type.

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But the browser doesn't look up elements to apply each CSS rule to, it checks which rules apply to each element.. –  Guffa Dec 14 '11 at 15:08
    
-1 This answer is not at all relevant to the question, because there is no element lookup when CSS rules are applied. The browser check which rules apply to an element, not which elements a rule applies to. –  Guffa Dec 15 '11 at 9:39

I think because in the first example, the browser rendering engine should search for every element with class classname inside the #id element.

The second example would be faster because the engine looks just for every element element with that class.

Sorry for the word game, however this should be non influential from a performance perspective.

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1  
But the browser doesn't look up elements to apply each CSS rule to, it checks which rules apply to each element... –  Guffa Dec 14 '11 at 13:18

It's not.

For the first selector, the browser checks if an element has the class, then it checks if any descendant has the id.

For the second selector, the browser checks if an element has the class, then if checks if the element matches the tag name, then it checks if any descendant has the id.

If the selectors have the same effect, the first selector is better, as the browser has to do fewer checks to match the rule.

More information about efficient selectors: http://code.google.com/speed/page-speed/docs/rendering.html#UseEfficientCSSSelectors

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Don't overoptimize your code, make it clear (and this is just about you and your habits, or your team standard) and see about performance later.

When your css selector will be your bottleneck, then you'll have 1 000 engineers working for you.

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This question was not whether to worry about performance or not. –  Jason T Featheringham Dec 14 '11 at 13:08
1  
@JasonTFeatheringham "from a rendering/performance perspective?" hmm kinda and my answer is "no it doesn't because it's so little that you should care about it and care only about the clarity of your code". –  remi bourgarel Dec 14 '11 at 13:37
    
I'm actually concerned from a Big O perspective, not a real use case. –  Jason T Featheringham Dec 14 '11 at 13:40
1  
@JasonTFeatheringham: That makes no sense –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 14 '11 at 13:45
    
How exactly does that not make sense? –  Jason T Featheringham Jan 23 '13 at 0:55

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