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How do I gzip compress a string in Python?

gzip.GzipFile exists, but that's for file objects - what about with plain strings?

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closed as off-topic by Zero Piraeus, Siddharth, Mr. Alien, MysticMagicϡ, dandan78 Jul 23 '13 at 5:09

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4  
What have you tried? Where did you look before posting this question? –  Oded Dec 14 '11 at 15:17
7  
first result for 'python gzip' docs.python.org/library/gzip.html (maybe you could try just a little?) –  KevinDTimm Dec 14 '11 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Pick a suitable module from http://docs.python.org/library/archiving.html -- either gzip or zlib, depending on your exact needs.

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1  
I see that zlib has several levels of compression. What is the level that gzip uses? –  bellpeace May 9 '12 at 1:11
2  
bellpeace, did you follow the link to the documentation for gzip? "The compresslevel argument is an integer from 1 to 9 controlling the level of compression; 1 is fastest and produces the least compression, and 9 is slowest and produces the most compression. The default is [REDACTED]". I'll let you check the actual value yourself. :) –  Lars Wirzenius May 9 '12 at 7:35
    
Oh, I totally missed that, sorry. –  bellpeace May 9 '12 at 18:18
    
The default is 9, the slowest. –  Prof. Falken Jan 17 '13 at 14:18
1  
The default is 6 now. "Compresses the data in string, returning a string contained compressed data. level is an integer from 0 to 9 controlling the level of compression; 1 is fastest and produces the least compression, 9 is slowest and produces the most. 0 is no compression. The default value is 6." –  Jonny Feb 19 '14 at 2:30

If you want to produce a complete gzip-compatible binary string, with the header etc, you could use gzip.GzipFile together with StringIO:

import StringIO
import gzip
out = StringIO.StringIO()
with gzip.GzipFile(fileobj=out, mode="w") as f:
  f.write("This is mike number one, isn't this a lot of fun?")
out.getvalue()

# returns '\x1f\x8b\x08\x00\xbd\xbe\xe8N\x02\xff\x0b\xc9\xc8,V\x00\xa2\xdc\xcc\xecT\x85\xbc\xd2\xdc\xa4\xd4"\x85\xfc\xbcT\x1d\xa0X\x9ez\x89B\tH:Q!\'\xbfD!?M!\xad4\xcf\x1e\x00w\xd4\xea\xf41\x00\x00\x00'
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4  
Life-saver. Just awesome. I know this is old, but thanks! –  Juan Carlos Coto Jun 5 '13 at 18:40
4  
This should be the accepted answer. –  ForeverWintr Feb 5 '14 at 21:22
    
The opposite of this is: `def gunzip_text(text): infile = StringIO.StringIO() infile.write(text) with gzip.GzipFile(fileobj=infile, mode="r") as f: f.rewind() f.read() return out.getvalue() –  fastmultiplication Apr 24 '14 at 13:07

The easiest way is the zlib encoding:

compressed_value = s.encode("zlib")

Then you decompress it with:

plain_string_again = compressed_value.decode("zlib")
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1  
is s the string? –  dcousens May 23 '12 at 5:03
1  
@Daniel: Yes, s is a Python 2.x object of type str. –  Sven Marnach May 23 '12 at 9:10
2  
See Standard Encodings for where he got that (scroll down to "codecs"). Also available: s.encode('rot13'), s.encode( 'base64' ) –  bobobobo Dec 19 '12 at 21:35
1  
Note that this method is incompatible with the gzip command-line utility in that gzip includes a header and checksum, while this mechanism simply compresses the content. –  tylerl Dec 29 '13 at 0:23
1  
@BenjaminToueg: Python 3 is stricter about the distinction between Unicode strings (type str in Python 3) and byte strings (type bytes). str objects have an encode() method that returns a bytes object, and bytes objects have a decode() method that returns a str. The zlib codec is special in that it converts from bytes to bytes, so it doesn't fit into this structure. You can use codecs.encode(b, "zlib") and codecs.decode(b, "slib") for a bytes object b instead. –  Sven Marnach Nov 27 '14 at 12:47
s = "a long string of characters"

g = gzip.open('gzipfilename.gz', 'w', 5) # ('filename', 'read/write mode', compression level)
g.write(s)
g.close()
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