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Newbie question: unless I'm mistaken, most attributes appear to be benign until you use runtime reflection on your assembly(ies) or classes to discover the attributes and act upon them. I've noticed that the ObsoleteAttribute seems to be unique in the .NET attributes where it can dynamically raise warnings and errors during compilation:

    [Obsolete("don't use", false)]  
    public string Name { get; set; }

The question I have is how does it do this? Is this something built in to the compiler, as the associated warning message number seems specific to the ObsoleteAttribute? I've google'd and can't find any obvious answers. I know with C++ and a combination of nifty macro tricks you can get C++ to emit warnings and errors on demand, but how does C# do this? Thanks...

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See this question and answers for other examples of special, compiler aware attrributes: ConditionalAttribute and other special classes –  George Duckett Dec 14 '11 at 15:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, the compiler is aware of ObsoleteAttribute - it's even listed in section 17.4.3 of the C# 4 language specification.

(The compiler also needs to know about AttributeUsageAttribute and ConditionalAttribute, and the MS compiler is aware of IndexerNameAttribute and some other attributes within System.Runtime.InteropServices.)

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So the implementation isn't necessarily in C#? The next part of my question would be 'How can I generate errors or warnings dynamically in my code?' - essentially I'd just like to know whether this is something that can be written by a user in existing C#, without resorting to something newer like the Roslyn CTP. –  Barry Dec 14 '11 at 15:34
    
@Barry: The bit that generates the error/warning is in the compiler, whichever implementation you're using. As for what you're trying to achieve... it depends what you mean by "dynamically." Are you aware of the #error and #warning pragmas? –  Jon Skeet Dec 14 '11 at 15:37
    
Thanks - yes I know about the pragmas, coming from a c++ background I've learnt to hate anything in code that begins with '#' and is preprocessor related :) I don't actually want to write the code, just satisfying my curiosity whether ObsoleteAttribute uses functionality not directly available in C#. –  Barry Dec 14 '11 at 15:45
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@Barry: It's not that there's any code in ObsoleteAttribute - it's that it's known about in a special way by the C# compiler. –  Jon Skeet Dec 14 '11 at 15:47

You are correct, the recognition and interpretation of this attribute is built into the compiler.

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As The Skeet notes, the compiler is aware of the ObsoleteAttribute. That's not the only one, either; check out ConditionalAttribute, too.

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See this question and answers for other examples of special, compiler aware attrributes: ConditionalAttribute and other special classes –  George Duckett Dec 14 '11 at 15:30

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