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I'm looking for a method to looks for file which resides in a few directories in a given path. In other words, those directories will be having files with same filename across. My script seem to have the hierarchy problem on looking into the correct path to grep the filename for processing. I have a fix path as input and the script will need to looks into the path and finding files from there but my script seem stuck on 2 tiers up and process from there rather than looking into the last directories in the tier (in my case here it process on "ln" and "nn" and start processing the subroutine).

The fix input path is:-

/nfs/disks/version_2.0/

The files that I want to do post processing by subroutine will be exist under several directories as below. Basically I wanted to check if the file1.abc do exists in all the directories temp1, temp2 & temp3 under ln directory. Same for file2.abc if exist in temp1, temp2, temp3 under nn directory.

The files that I wanted to check in full path will be like this:-

/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp1/file1.abc
/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp2/file1.abc
/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp3/file1.abc

/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/nn/temp1/file2.abc
/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/nn/temp2/file2.abc
/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/nn/temp3/file2.abc

My script as below:-

#! /usr/bin/perl -w 
my $dir = '/nfs/fm/disks/version_2.0/' ;
opendir(TEMP, $dir) || die $! ;
foreach my $file (readdir(TEMP)) {
    next if ($file eq "." || $file eq "..") ;
    if (-d "$dir/$file") {
        my $d = "$dir/$file";   
        print "Directory:- $d\n" ;
        &getFile($d);
        &compare($file) ;
    }
}

Note that I put the print "Directory:- $d\n" ; there for debug purposes and it printed this:-

/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/
/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_b/

So I knew it get into the wrong path for processing the following subroutine.

Can somebody help to point me where is the error in my script? Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
Check out File::Find. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 14 '11 at 15:46
    
Your code requires a directory named "fm", but the full paths that you say you want to find do not have a directory name "fm". –  tadmc Dec 14 '11 at 19:22
    
Hi tadmc, Thanks for pointing out that. Corrected. –  Grace Dec 15 '11 at 1:28
    
Hi Jonathan Leffler, before this I read about Find::Find but somehow don't really understand how to apply it practically. –  Grace Dec 15 '11 at 1:30

2 Answers 2

To be clear: the script is supposed to recurse through a directory and look for files with a particular filename? In this case, I think the following code is the problem:

if (-d "$dir/$file") {
    my $d = "$dir/$file";   
    print "Directory:- $d\n" ;
    &getFile($d);
    &compare($file) ;
}

I'm assuming the &getFile($d) is meant to step into a directory (i.e., the recursive step). This is fine. However, it looks like the &compare($file) is the action that you want to take when the object that you're looking at isn't a directory. Therefore, that code block should look something like this:

if (-d "$dir/$file") {
    &getFile("$dir/$file");  # the recursive step, for directories inside of this one
} elsif( -f "$dir/$file" ){
    &compare("$dir/$file");  # the action on files inside of the current directory
}

The general pseudo-code should like like this:

sub myFind {
    my $dir = shift;
    foreach my $file( stat $dir ){
        next if $file -eq "." || $file -eq ".."
        my $obj = "$dir/$file";
        if( -d $obj ){
            myFind( $obj );
        } elsif( -f $obj ){
            doSomethingWithFile( $obj );
        }
    }
}
myFind( "/nfs/fm/disks/version_2.0" );

As a side note: this script is reinventing the wheel. You only need to write a script that does the processing on an individual file. You could do the rest entirely from the shell:

find /nfs/fm/disks/version_2.0 -type f -name "the-filename-you-want" -exec your_script.pl {} \;
share|improve this answer
2  
you should not use ampersand on subroutine calls. –  tadmc Dec 14 '11 at 19:22

Wow, it's like reliving the 1990s! Perl code has evolved somewhat, and you really need to learn the new stuff. It looks like you learned Perl in version 3.0 or 4.0. Here's some pointers:

  • Use use warnings; instead of -w on the command line.
  • Use use strict;. This will require you to predeclare variables using my which will scope them to the local block or the file if they're not in a local block. This helps catch a lot of errors.
  • Don't put & in front of subroutine names.
  • Use and, or, and not instead of &&, ||, and !.
  • Learn about Perl Modules which can save you a lot of time and effort.

When someone says detect duplicates, I immediately think of hashes. If you use a hash based upon your file's name, you can easily see if there are duplicate files.

Of course a hash can only have a single value for each key. Fortunately, in Perl 5.x, that value can be a reference to another data structure.

So, I recommend you use a hash that contains a reference to a list (array in old parlance). You can push each instance of the file to that list.

Using your example, you'd have a data structure that looks like this:

%file_hash = {
    file1.abc => [
       /nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp1
       /nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp2
       /nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp3
    ],
    file2.abc => [
       /nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/nn/temp1
       /nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/nn/temp2
       /nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/nn/temp3
   ];

And, here's a program to do it:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
#
use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);        #Can use `say` which is like `print "\n"`;

use File::Basename; #imports `dirname` and `basename` commands
use File::Find;             #Implements Unix `find` command.

use constant DIR => "/nfs/disks/version_2.0";

# Find all duplicates
my %file_hash;
find (\&wanted, DIR);

# Print out all the duplicates
foreach my $file_name (sort keys %file_hash) {
    if (scalar (@{$file_hash{$file_name}}) > 1) {
        say qq(Duplicate File: "$file_name");
        foreach my $dir_name (@{$file_hash{$file_name}}) {
            say "    $dir_name";
        }
    }
}

sub wanted {
    return if not -f $_;    

    if (not exists $file_hash{$_}) {
        $file_hash{$_} = [];
    }
    push @{$file_hash{$_}}, $File::Find::dir;
}

Here's a few things about File::Find:

  • The work takes place in the subroutine wanted.
  • The $_ is the name of the file, and I can use this to see if this is a file or directory
  • $File::Find::Name is the full name of the file including the path.
  • $File::Find::dir is the name of the directory.

If the array reference doesn't exist, I create it with the $file_hash{$_} = [];. This isn't necessary, but I find it comforting, and it can prevent errors. To use $file_hash{$_} as an array, I have to dereference it. I do that by putting a @ in front of it, so it can be @$file_hash{$_} or, @{$file_hash{$_}}.

Once all the file are found, I can print out the entire structure. The only thing I do is check to make sure there is more than one member in each array. If there's only a single member, then there are no duplicates.


Response to Grace

Hi David W., thank you very much for your explainaion and sample script. Sorry maybe I'm not really clear in definding my problem statement. I think I can't use hash in my path finding for the data structure. Since the file*.abc is a few hundred and undertermined and each of the file*.abc even is having same filename but it is actually differ in content in each directory structures.

Such as the file1.abc resides under "/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp1" is not the same content as file1.abc resides under "/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp2" and "/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp3". My intention is to grep the list of files*.abc in each of the directories structure (temp1, temp2 and temp3 ) and compare the filename list with a masterlist. Could you help to shed some lights on how to solve this? Thanks. – Grace yesterday

I'm just printing the file in my sample code, but instead of printing the file, you could open them and process them. After all, you now have the file name and the directory. Here's the heart of my program again. This time, I'm opening the file and looking at the content:

foreach my $file_name (sort keys %file_hash) {
    if (scalar (@{$file_hash{$file_name}}) > 1) {
        #say qq(Duplicate File: "$file_name");
        foreach my $dir_name (@{$file_hash{$file_name}}) {
            #say "    $dir_name";
            open (my $fh, "<", "$dir_name/$file_name")
              or die qq(Can't open file "$dir_name/$file_name" for reading);
            # Process your file here...
            close $fh;
        }
    }
}

If you are only looking for certain files, you could modify the wanted function to skip over files you don't want. For example, here I am only looking for files which match the file*.txt pattern. Note I use a regular expression of /^file.*\.txt$/ to match the name of the file. As you can see, it's the same as the previous wanted subroutine. The only difference is my test: I'm looking for something that is a file (-f) and has the correct name (file*.txt):

sub wanted {
    return if not -f $_ and /^file.*\.txt$/;    

    if (not exists $file_hash{$_}) {
        $file_hash{$_} = [];
    }
    push @{$file_hash{$_}}, $File::Find::dir;
}

If you are looking at the file contents, you can use the MD5 hash to determine if the file contents match or don't match. This reduces a file to a mere string of 16 to 28 characters which could even be used as a hash key instead of the file name. This way, files that have matching MD5 hashes (and thus matching contents) would be in the same hash list.

You talk about a "master list" of files and it seems you have the idea that this master list needs to match the content of the file you're looking for. So, I'm making a slight mod in my program. I am first taking that master list you talked about, and generating MD5 sums for each file. Then I'll look at all the files in that directory, but only take the ones with the matching MD5 hash...

By the way, this has not been tested.

#! /usr/bin/env perl
#
use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);        #Can use `say` which is like `print "\n"`;

use File::Find;             #Implements Unix `find` command.
use Digest::file qw(digest_file_hex);

use constant DIR         => "/nfs/disks/version_2.0";
use constant MASTER_LIST_DIR => "/some/directory";

# First, I'm going thorugh the MASTER_LIST_DIR directory
# and finding all of the master list files. I'm going to take
# the MD5 hash of those files, and store them in a Perl hash 
# that's keyed by the name of file file. Thus, when I find a 
# file with a matching name, I can compare the MD5 of that file
# and the master file. If they match, the files are the same. If
# not, they're different.

# In this example, I'm inlining the function I use to find the files
# instead of making it a separat function.

my %master_hash;
find (
    {
        %master_hash($_) = digest_file_hex($_, "MD5") if -f;
    },
    MASTER_LIST_DIR
);

# Now I have the MD5 of all the master files, I'm going to search my
# DIR directory for the files that have the same MD5 hash as the
# master list files did. If they do have the same MD5 hash, I'll
# print out their names as before.

my %file_hash;
find (\&wanted, DIR);

# Print out all the duplicates
foreach my $file_name (sort keys %file_hash) {
    if (scalar (@{$file_hash{$file_name}}) > 1) {
        say qq(Duplicate File: "$file_name");
        foreach my $dir_name (@{$file_hash{$file_name}}) {
            say "    $dir_name";
        }
    }
}

# The wanted function has been modified since the last example.
# Here, I'm only going to put files in the %file_hash if they

sub wanted {
    if (-f $_ and $file_hash{$_} = digest_file_hex($_, "MD5")) {
        $file_hash{$_} //= [];    #Using TLP's syntax hint
        push @{$file_hash{$_}}, $File::Find::dir;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi David W., thank you very much for your explainaion and sample script. Sorry maybe I'm not really clear in definding my problem statement. I think I can't use hash in my path finding for the data structure. Since the file*.abc is a few hundred and undertermined and each of the file*.abc even is having same filename but it is actually differ in content in each directory structures. –  Grace Dec 15 '11 at 1:48
    
SUch as the file1.abc resides under "/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp1" is not the same content as file1.abc resides under "/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp2" and "/nfs/disks/version_2.0/dir_a/ln/temp3". My intention is to grep the list of files*.abc in each of the directories structure (temp1, temp2 and temp3 ) and compare the filename list with a masterlist. Could you help to shed some lights on how to solve this? Thanks. –  Grace Dec 15 '11 at 1:52
1  
If you really wanted to live on the edge, you would have wrote $file_hash{$_} //= [] instead of the if-statement. –  TLP Dec 15 '11 at 2:20
    
Sorry that I'm novice in scripting as real code is more practical to help me on understanding and learning on Perl. I'm out of idea on how to get this done :(. –  Grace Dec 15 '11 at 4:41
1  
@flesk it is not exactly the same. //= checks only for definedness, ||= for 0, '' or undef. –  TLP Dec 16 '11 at 21:01

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