Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have large log files which contains timestamps every one second.what I need is to cut a user defined part from this huge file and save it in another text file..i am confused since the fstream class can deal with a max file size of 2GB and reading all lines is time and memory disaster.

timestamp pattern : !<< dd.mm.yyyy hh:min:sec> every second and one per line . one prof. guy suggested using LINQ and readline().

a sample of the file :

!<<14.12.2012 16:20:03>
some text some text some 
some text some text some 
some text some text some 
!<<14.12.2012 16:20:04>
some text some text some 
some text some text some 
some text some text some 
some text some text some 
some text some text some 
!<<14.12.2012 16:20:05>
some text some text some
!<<14.12.2012 16:20:06>
some text some text some 
some text some text some 

and so on till EOF.

share|improve this question
    
If you know the exact time period you require you could read the first line and then work out from that time stamp exactly which lines you need to extract. –  Richard Dalton Dec 14 '11 at 15:44
    
check this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/1124034/… –  Davide Piras Dec 14 '11 at 15:45
    
@RichardD:Not if the number of lines of text between timestamps varies though. –  George Duckett Dec 14 '11 at 15:48
    
How is "a user defined part" specified? –  Henk Holterman Dec 14 '11 at 15:49
    
@GeorgeDuckett Ahh, the edit ruins my idea :( The description implied that each line would contain a timestamp –  Richard Dalton Dec 14 '11 at 15:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

ReadLine is not at all what you want to do... open a file reader... seek to the position you want, read the data out you want (into another file stream).

"ReadLine" has to actually read the data... whereas seeking (myStream.Position = whereIWantToGo) is basically instant.

You would handle this the same way you would a sorted database. A DB with 1,000,000 records only takes 20 "seek" operations to find... start halfway, too high? just saved 500,000 seeks... come back halfway... too high? just shaved off 250,000 more seeks... rinse, repeat.

If you find funny characters (bad encoding)

Per your email (btw - you should really continue to use S.O., not email - that way other people can benefit)... The answer is that you need to try different encoding types. Your file may not be encoded UTF8 (which is what my code below is expecting). So, use new StreamReader("MyLogFile.txt", Encoding.ASCII), or some other encoding until it works for you.

C# console app that should get you started

Disclaimer... this code is nasty, and might have bugs where there is an infinite loop :)... but, here is a console app that should work for you.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Globalization;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // example dates
            var lookFor = new DateTime(2012, 12, 14, 16, 20, 02);
            var readUntilDate = new DateTime(2012, 12, 14, 16, 20, 05);

            using (var stream = File.OpenText("MyLogFile.txt"))
            {
                if (SeekToEntry(stream, lookFor) == false)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Could not find entry for date {0}", lookFor);
                    return;
                }

                foreach (var line in ReadEntriesUntil(stream, readUntilDate))
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Line: {0}", line);
                }
            }
        }

        // This method simply spits out one line at a time until it hits
        // the target cut-off.
        static IEnumerable<string> ReadEntriesUntil(StreamReader stream, DateTime target)
        {
            while (true)
            {
                string line = stream.ReadLine();

                if (line == null)
                {
                    break;
                }

                if (line.StartsWith("!<<"))
                {
                    DateTime entryDate;

                    if (DateTime.TryParseExact(line.Substring(3, 19).Replace(".", ""), @"ddMMyyyy HH:mm:ss",
                        CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out entryDate))
                    {
                        if (entryDate >= target)
                        {
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                }

                yield return line;
            }
        }

        // This method will bounce around the stream till it finds your
        // target entry date.
        static bool SeekToEntry(StreamReader stream, DateTime target)
        {
            long from = 0;
            long to = stream.BaseStream.Length;

            while (true)
            {
                long testIndex = (to - from) / 2;

                stream.BaseStream.Seek(testIndex, SeekOrigin.Begin);

                var entryDate = GetNextEntryDate(stream, out testIndex);

                if (entryDate == null || (from == to))
                {
                    return false;
                }

                switch (entryDate.Value.CompareTo(target))
                {
                    case -1:
                        // Found too low...
                        from = testIndex;
                        break;

                    case 1:
                        // Fount too high...
                        to = testIndex;
                        break;

                    default: return true;
                }
            }
        }

        // This is a function that is meant to keep seeking forward until
        // it hits an entry date.
        static DateTime? GetNextEntryDate(StreamReader stream, out long actualIndex)
        {
            actualIndex = stream.BaseStream.Position;
            DateTime? result = null;
            string line = null;

            // Find the next entry.
            while ((line = stream.ReadLine()) != null && line.StartsWith("!<<") == false) ;

            if (line != null)
            {
                actualIndex = stream.BaseStream.Position - line.Length;

                DateTime timeStamp;

                if (DateTime.TryParseExact(line.Substring(3, 19).Replace(".", ""), @"ddMMyyyy HH:mm:ss",
                    CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out timeStamp))
                {
                    result = timeStamp;
                }
            }

            return result;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think he could seek if the text in between the timestamps varies. –  George Duckett Dec 14 '11 at 15:47
1  
@GeorgeDuckett: You can (under-)estimate a Position and catch up with the line format again. –  Henk Holterman Dec 14 '11 at 15:50
    
@HenkHolterman: Yeah, as Bryan's question explains, however i thought it was worth pointing out that Tim's answer as is isn't complete. i.e. the main problem remains, how to seek 'to the position you want' –  George Duckett Dec 14 '11 at 15:52
    
thanks but how should i know whereIWantToGo in the text file!i have the time given but how to reach it without going through all the lines before which could be time and memory consuming? –  user1096252 Dec 14 '11 at 15:55
1  
would you please post a psedu code for this in csharp.it would really be great since i am still a beginner. –  user1096252 Dec 14 '11 at 16:45

Start with an educated guess as to how deep the timestamp is into the file. If you can't do that, start in the middle -- in effect, do a binary search.

Once you've seek'ed to a spot, read a few lines (*) until you find a timestamp. At that point you either have your timestamp, or you can determine if it's before or after the current point. If it's not your timestamp, seek backwards or forwards a logical amount and repeat until you find the timestamp you are looking for.

With this technique you can probably find your timestamp with just a few dozen reads or so.

You might want to read up on seek on MSDN.

* be aware that when you seek, the file pointer may not be at the beginning of a line. This technique will still work of course, but it's something to be aware of when you've narrowed down your search to a very small range.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - done this many times. Selecting the halfway point each time, so that you effectively halve the data searched through with each iteration. –  ChrisBD Dec 14 '11 at 15:59
1  
Also known as Binary Search - see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_algorithm. –  ShellShock Dec 14 '11 at 16:11
    
Thanks Guys...would you please post a psedu code for this in csharp.it would really be great. –  user1096252 Dec 14 '11 at 16:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.