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I have been working on setting up a WCF REST service in .NET 4.0. I have GET requests working, but any request that involves POSTing data to the server fails with a HTTP 400 Bad Request.

This is my simple service:

[ServiceContract]
[AspNetCompatibilityRequirements(RequirementsMode = AspNetCompatibilityRequirementsMode.Allowed)]
[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.PerCall)]
public class Service1
{
    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "")]
    public string HelloWorld()
    {
        return "hello world";
    }

    [WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "", Method = "POST")]
    public string HelloWorldPost(string name)
    {
        return "hello " + name;
    }
}

My Web.config:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>

  <system.web>
    <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0" />
  </system.web>

  <system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true">
      <add name="UrlRoutingModule" type="System.Web.Routing.UrlRoutingModule, System.Web, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" />
    </modules>
  </system.webServer>

  <system.serviceModel>
    <serviceHostingEnvironment aspNetCompatibilityEnabled="true"/>
    <protocolMapping>
      <add scheme="http" binding="webHttpBinding" />      
    </protocolMapping>
    <standardEndpoints>
      <webHttpEndpoint>
        <!-- 
            Configure the WCF REST service base address via the global.asax.cs file and the default endpoint 
            via the attributes on the <standardEndpoint> element below
        -->
        <standardEndpoint name="" helpEnabled="true" automaticFormatSelectionEnabled="true"/>
      </webHttpEndpoint>
    </standardEndpoints>
  </system.serviceModel>

</configuration>

And my global.asax:

public class Global : HttpApplication
{
    void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        RegisterRoutes();
    }

    private void RegisterRoutes()
    {
        RouteTable.Routes.Add(new ServiceRoute("Service1", new WebServiceHostFactory(), typeof(Service1)));
    }
}

Basically, everything is default from the template, but I've just simplified the Service1. I have tried both running it through the debugger and passing a request through Fiddler and running it in IIS and doing the same, as well as using a simple console application to fake the POST but I always get the 400 Bad Request error and I have no idea why. I've looked all over the internet and can't figure anything out.

I've tried both of the following request examples (neither work):

XML:

<string xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/10/Serialization/">String content</string>

JSON:

"String content"
share|improve this question
    
@Will why was the rest tag removed, this post is regarding a REST web service... –  shuniar Dec 16 '11 at 16:16
    
This post is a question about HTTP, WCF, ASP, .NET, etc. It has nothing to do with the REST architecture. It's an implementation issue, not a design or architecture question. –  Will Hartung Dec 16 '11 at 16:56
    
Does the GET version of HelloWorld work? –  Drew Marsh Dec 18 '11 at 18:31
    
@Drew Yes, I thought it was implied but I should have specified. –  shuniar Dec 20 '11 at 4:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

Are you setting the Content-Type header correctly in your request? For the XML request it should be text/xml and for the JSON it should be application/json. Your code works for me when I set the Content-Type in Fiddler.

You should also set the Accept header in your GET to either text/xml or application/json depending on what format you want the response to be in. It is okay for the POST as the server will assume that you want the response in the same format as the request, because you have set automaticFormatSelectionEnabled="true" in your web.config. There's more detail about format selection in WCF REST here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/endpoint/archive/2010/01/18/automatic-and-explicit-format-selection-in-wcf-webhttp-services.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I knew it hat to be something trivial that I was missing but I just couldn't figure it out. Works perfect after I add the right headers. –  shuniar Dec 20 '11 at 4:44

Your attributes should not be in the implementation, they should be in the operation contract. You also need to make sure you have any named parameters included in the UriTemplate. They are case sensitive so they have to match exactly.

IService.cs

[ServiceContract]
public class IService1
{
    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "")]
    [OperationContract]
    public string HelloWorld();

    [WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "/{name}", Method = "POST")]
    [OperationContract]
    public string HelloWorldPost(string name);
}

Service.cs

public class Service1 : IService
{

    public string HelloWorld()
    {
        return "hello world";
    }

    public string HelloWorldPost(string name)
    {
        return "hello " + name;
    }
}

You need to configure the service in your web.config file as well under System.ServiceModel

<system.serviceModel>
    <services>
      <service name="Service1">
        <endpoint address="basic" binding="basicHttpBinding" contract="IService1" />
      </service>
    <services>
</system.serviceModel>

That's some of the main concepts and should get you started in the right direction. If you want a good test project to start out just use the "WCF Application" project template in VS2010. It has most of the required pieces wired in for you. Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
My actual service is implemented this way, this is just a test project because I could not figure out why GET was working but POST wasn't. Also, the parameter isn't required in the URI if you pass it in the request body. This is a helpful post though, thanks. –  shuniar Dec 20 '11 at 4:47
    
Did you use the BodyStyle attribute so the binder will know how the parameter will be coming in? Use the WebMessageFormat wrapped and set the RequestFormat to JSON. Then, you can post a simple JSON object in your request body that has properties for each of your parameters. Very clean! Make sure the case is correct on the property names though. –  jerrylroberts Dec 20 '11 at 13:59

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