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Given that this field locale have been set for norwegian bokmål and norway:

Locale locale = new Locale("nb","no"); 

What's missing from this code fragment inside a method to return the proper string for the language bokmål?

Assert.assertNotNull(locale);//Is asserted
MutableDateTime start = new MutableDateTime(2012,1, 10,10,0,0,0 );
start.setDayOfWeek(DateTimeConstants.SATURDAY);
System.out.println(start.dayOfWeek().getAsText(locale));
System.out.println(locale.getISO3Language().toString());

The output is "Saturday, nob" Do I need to implement locale specific weekday name strings myself? If so is there some base object or interface to override in jodatime? I can't seem to find one.

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Is your nb_NO Locale available? docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/i18n/locale/identify.html –  Rob Hruska Dec 14 '11 at 17:01
    
Is there some particular reason you're using a MutableDateTime? And my code prints out what I can only assume is the appropriate translation: "lørdag" - Are you sure that the locale is getting setup/passed in properly? –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 14 '11 at 17:01
    
No, I must investigate Locale a bit more. This code from the Oracle Page you linked renders only "be ar" which is mighty strange: public class AvailableLocales { static public void main(String[] args) { Locale list[] = DateFormat.getAvailableLocales(); for (Locale aLocale : list) { System.out.println(aLocale.toString()); } } } –  MiB Dec 15 '11 at 0:16
    
I'm only using MutableDateTime because I'm modifying the date step by step based on week selection and it seemed unnecessary to copy around a range of immutable value objects inside the method. –  MiB Dec 15 '11 at 0:20
    
Note, that the short locale list "be, ar" was with openjdk, not Apple jdk1.5. –  MiB Dec 15 '11 at 1:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code works correctly for me:

[system:/tmp]$ cat Loc.java
import org.joda.time.*;
import java.util.Locale;

class Loc {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Locale locale = new Locale("nb","no");
        MutableDateTime start = new MutableDateTime(2012,1, 10,10,0,0,0 );
        start.setDayOfWeek(DateTimeConstants.SATURDAY);
        System.out.println(start.dayOfWeek().getAsText(locale));
        System.out.println(locale.getISO3Language().toString());
    }
}
[system:/tmp]$ java Loc
lørdag
nob

A few things to try:

  • Try using new Locale("nb", "NO") (country/region is supposed to be case-insentive, but it's worth a shot)
  • Try using new Locale("no", "NO") or new Locale("nn", "NO") - Nyorsk may not be what you're looking for, but does it work? From some Googling, it seems like some platforms might treat nb_NO as an alias for no_NO? It might be useful just to know if that does or doesn't work.
  • Make sure the nb_NO locale is available. It probably is since getISO3Language() seems to work.
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Thanks for your test drive and your references. I'll try your suggestions and report back. –  MiB Dec 14 '11 at 23:07
    
Your kind response with a link to Oracle got me on to the right track. I started to suspect that the openjdk7 port I was using was incomplete and proved it with just getting "ar" and "be" when getting all available locales and changed my project to Apples supplied jdk1.5. "no_NO" still didn't work properly and gave me the weekday in swedish (my system is set to swedish). The proper code for Apples jdk1.5 at least was simply "no". That gave me similar results as yours: "lørdag nor" . Thank you! –  MiB Dec 15 '11 at 0:41
    
I'm expecting Robs answer above to be correct in most cases, but in the case of Apples jdk1.5 as of OS X 10.5.8 only "no" gave the result I was looking for. –  MiB Dec 15 '11 at 1:01

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