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I trying to figure out if is it possible in MongoDB to push an element and in the same time (atomic FindAndModify operation) update the max value of the elements in the array.

Example:

{
  "_id": "...",
  "max_value": 10,
  "values": [2, 10, 6]
}

And after I insert 20, the result would be:

{
  "_id": "...",
  "max_value": 20,
  "values": [2, 10, 6, 20]
}

The value 20 pushed to the values array, and the max_value field re-calculated (to be 20) in the same atomic operation.

Is it possible?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: Upon further reflection, my original answer was correct, but wasteful. Specifically, the first step is not necessary, so here's a revised version:

You can emulate this process in two steps:

  1. findAndModify with _id and max_value $lte the value you're currently attempting to insert. Since _id is unique, you know that only zero or one documents can match this query -- assuming that a document with that _id exists, it is zero in the case where the max_value is greater than what you're inserting, and one in the case where it is less than or equal. In the update, $push the new value, and $set max_value.

  2. If and only if step #1 failed, findAndModify again with _id, and $push the new value to the array. Since step #1 failed, we know that the current max_value is greater than the new value, so we can ignore it and just $push the new value.

Here's sample Python code to implement this:

# the_id is the ObjectId of the document we want to modify
# new_value is the new value to append to the list
rslt1 = rslt2 = None

rslt1 = db.collection.find_and_modify(
    {'_id': the_id, 'max_value': {'$lte': new_value}},
    {'$push': {'array': new_value}, '$set': {'max_value': new_value}})

if rslt1 is None:
    rslt2 = db.collection.find_and_modify(
        {'_id': the_id},
        {'$push': {'array': new_value}})

# only one of these will be non-None; this
# picks whichever is non-None and assigns
# it to rslt
rslt = rslt1 or rslt2

(This original answer works, but the updated version above is more efficient.)

You can emulate this process in three steps:

  1. findAndModify a document with the given _id and with max_value $gt the current value you're attempting to insert. Since _id is unique, you know that only zero or one documents can match this query -- assuming that a document with that _id exists, it is zero in the case where the max_value is less than what you're inserting, and one in the case where it is greater. The update portion for this findAndModify will $push the new value to the array.

  2. If and only if step #1 failed, findAndModify again with _id and max_value $lte the value you're currently attempting to insert. In the update, $push the new value, and $set max_value.

  3. If and only if step #2 failed, findAndModify again with _id, and $push the new value to the array. This covers the case where between steps #1 and #2, another thread upped the max_value to a value greater than the value you're currently inserting.

Here's sample Python code to implement this:

# the_id is the ObjectId of the document we want to modify
# new_value is the new value to append to the list
rslt1 = rslt2 = rslt3 = None
rslt1 = db.collection.find_and_modify(
    {'_id': the_id, 'max_value': {'$gt': new_value}},
    {'$push': {'array': new_value}})

if rslt1 is None:
    rslt2 = db.collection.find_and_modify(
        {'_id': the_id, 'max_value': {'$lte': new_value}},
        {'$push': {'array': new_value}, '$set': {'max_value': new_value}})

if rslt1 is None and rslt2 is None:
    rslt3 = db.collection.find_and_modify(
        {'_id': the_id},
        {'$push': {'array': new_value}})

# only one of these will be non-None; this
# picks whichever is non-None and assigns
# it to rslt
rslt = rslt1 or rslt2 or rslt3
share|improve this answer
    
good tip. definitely +1 –  Andrew Orsich Dec 14 '11 at 17:59
    
Thanks a lot! +1 –  Roei Dec 15 '11 at 8:23

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