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Consider a structure where you have a many-to-one (or one-to-many) relationship with a condition (where, order by, etc.) on both tables. For example:

CREATE TABLE tableTwo (
    id INT UNSIGNED PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    eventTime DATETIME NOT NULL,
    INDEX (eventTime)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE tableOne (
    id INT UNSIGNED PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    tableTwoId INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    objectId INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    INDEX (objectID),
    FOREIGN KEY (tableTwoId) REFERENCES tableTwo (id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

and for an example query:

select * from tableOne t1 
  inner join tableTwo t2 on t1.tableTwoId = t2.id
  where objectId = '..'
  order by eventTime;

Let's say you index tableOne.objectId and tableTwo.eventTime. If you then explain on the above query, it will show "Using filesort". Essentially, it first applies the tableOne.objectId index, but it can't apply the tableTwo.eventTime index because that index is for the entirety of tableTwo (not the limited result set), and thus it must do a manual sort.

Thus, is there a way to do a cross-table index so it wouldn't have to filesort each time results are retrieved? Something like:

create index ind_t1oi_t2et on tableOne t1 
  inner join tableTwo t2 on t1.tableTwoId = t2.id 
  (t1.objectId, t2.eventTime);

Also, I've looked into creating a view and indexing that, but indexing is not supported for views.

The solution I've been leaning towards if cross-table indexing isn't possible is replicating the conditional data in one table. In this case that means eventTime would be replicated in tableOne and a multi-column index would be set up on tableOne.objectId and tableOne.eventTime (essentially manually creating the index). However, I thought I'd seek out other people's experience first to see if that was the best way.

Thanks much!

Update:

Here are some procedures for loading test data and comparing results:

drop procedure if exists populate_table_two;
delimiter #
create procedure populate_table_two(IN numRows int)
begin
declare v_counter int unsigned default 0;
  while v_counter < numRows do
    insert into tableTwo (eventTime) 
    values (CURRENT_TIMESTAMP - interval 0 + floor(0 + rand()*1000) minute);
    set v_counter=v_counter+1;
  end while;
end #
delimiter ;

drop procedure if exists populate_table_one;
delimiter #
create procedure populate_table_one
   (IN numRows int, IN maxTableTwoId int, IN maxObjectId int)
begin
declare v_counter int unsigned default 0;
  while v_counter < numRows do
    insert into tableOne (tableTwoId, objectId) 
      values (floor(1 +(rand() * maxTableTwoId)), 
              floor(1 +(rand() * maxObjectId)));
    set v_counter=v_counter+1;
  end while;
end #
delimiter ;

You can use these as follows to populate 10,000 rows in tableTwo and 20,000 rows in tableOne (with random references to tableOne and random objectIds between 1 and 5), which took 26.2 and 70.77 seconds respectively to run for me:

call populate_table_two(10000);
call populate_table_one(20000, 10000, 5);

Update 2 (Tested Triggering SQL):

Below is the tried and tested SQL based on daniHp's triggering method. This keeps the dateTime in sync on tableOne when tableOne is added or tableTwo is updated. Also, this method should also work for many-to-many relationships if the condition columns are copied to the joining table. In my testing of 300,000 rows in tableOne and 200,000 rows in tableTwo, the speed of the old query with similar limits was 0.12 sec and the speed of the new query still shows as 0.00 seconds. Thus, there is a clear improvement, and this method should perform well into the millions of rows and farther.

alter table tableOne add column tableTwo_eventTime datetime;

create index ind_t1_oid_t2et on tableOne (objectId, tableTwo_eventTime);

drop TRIGGER if exists t1_copy_t2_eventTime;
delimiter #
CREATE TRIGGER t1_copy_t2_eventTime
   BEFORE INSERT ON tableOne
for each row
begin
  set NEW.tableTwo_eventTime = (select eventTime 
       from tableTwo t2
       where t2.id = NEW.tableTwoId);
end #
delimiter ;

drop TRIGGER if exists upd_t1_copy_t2_eventTime;
delimiter #
CREATE TRIGGER upd_t1_copy_t2_eventTime
   BEFORE UPDATE ON tableTwo
for each row
begin
  update tableOne 
    set tableTwo_eventTime = NEW.eventTime 
    where tableTwoId = NEW.id;
end #
delimiter ;

And the updated query:

select * from tableOne t1 
  inner join tableTwo t2 on t1.tableTwoId = t2.id
  where t1.objectId = 1
  order by t1.tableTwo_eventTime desc limit 0,10;
share|improve this question
1  
You could create another aggregated table. –  anttir Dec 14 '11 at 19:34
    
@anttir: Is there a reason that would be preferable over replicating the data in one of the existing tables? –  Briguy37 Dec 14 '11 at 20:03
    
Sample code (here, in the form of SQL) is more useful than ad hoc schema. –  outis Dec 14 '11 at 22:00
    
@outis: Thanks, I will keep that in mind. –  Briguy37 Dec 14 '11 at 22:45
    
Can you improve on the question title? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 15 '11 at 17:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As you know, SQLServer achieve this with indexed views:

indexed views provide additional performance benefits that cannot be achieved using standard indexes. Indexed views can increase query performance in the following ways:

Aggregations can be precomputed and stored in the index to minimize expensive computations during query execution.

Tables can be prejoined and the resulting data set stored.

Combinations of joins or aggregations can be stored.

In sqlserver to take advantage of this technique you should query over view and not over tables, that means that you should know about the view and indexes.

mysql do not have indexed views but you can simulate the behavior with table + triggers + indexes.

Insteat of create a view you must create a indexed table, a trigger keep data table up to date and then you query your new table insteat normalized tables.

You must evaluate if overhead write operations offset the improvement in read operations.

Edited:

Notes that is not always necessary to create a new table, for example in a 1:N relation ship (master-detail) trigger can keep a copy of a field from 'master' table into 'detail' table. In your case:

CREATE TABLE tableOne (
    id INT UNSIGNED PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    tableTwoId INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    objectId INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    desnormalized_eventTime DATETIME NOT NULL,
    INDEX (objectID),
    FOREIGN KEY (tableTwoId) REFERENCES tableTwo (id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TRIGGER tableOne_desnormalized_eventTime
   BEFORE INSERT ON tableOne
for each row
begin
  DECLARE eventTime DATETIME;
  SET eventTime = 
      (select eventTime 
       from tableOne
       where tableOne.id = NEW.tableTwoId);
  NEW.desnormalized_eventTime = eventTime;
end;

Notice that this is a before insert trigger.

Now, the query rewrited is:

select * from tableOne t1 
  inner join tableTwo t2 on t1.tableTwoId = t2.id
  where t1.objectId = '..'
  order by t1.desnormalized_eventTime;

Disclaimer: not tested.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: I like the idea of using triggers to copy the indexing data around! I'll likely go with this method, but add eventTime directly to tableOne, as that should minimize the copying, code-rewriting, and additional memory consumption required for the solution. –  Briguy37 Dec 14 '11 at 22:36
    
nice. If it is database who maintains replicate data, they are no way to forget to make updates. At this moment, I'm working with ORM (django) and I keep this kind of code in save() method (object persistence). I hesitated to do so for normalization reasons, but I'm glad to replicate data. For a 'academic developer' is a hard decision ;) –  danihp Dec 14 '11 at 22:47
    
Note: For those using this solution, be sure to add an update trigger on tableTwo as well if the eventTime is not fixed. –  Briguy37 Dec 15 '11 at 20:58

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