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I would like some help understanding how to deal with isstringstream objects.

I am trying to tokenize each line of a file so I can re-write it in another format after checking certain data values in the tokens. I am loading each line in a tokenVector and iterating through the vector. My code works, but what concerns me is that I have to instantiate a isstringstrem object for each iteration otherwise it does not work. That does not feel right. Her is my code:

std::string line;//each file line
std::ifstream myFile (info.txt.c_str());
if(myFile.is_open()){

     getline(myFile, line);
     std::vector<std::string> tokenVector;

    //create a isstringstream object for tokenizing each line of the file
    std::istringstream hasTokens(line);

    while(hasTokens)
    {
        std::string substring;
        if(! getline(hasTokens, substring,','))
            break;
        tokenVector.push_back(substring);

    }

    //look for some known header names for validation
    if(!tokenVector.empty()){

    if(!(tokenVector[0]=="Time")&&(tokenVector[1] == "Group")&&(tokenVector[2]=="Perception")&&(tokenVector[3] == "Sign")){
        setErrorMesssage("Invalid Header in myFile");
        return false;
        }

        tokenVector.clear();
    }

    //clear the isstringstream object
    hasTokens.str(std::string());

//if header validates, do rest of file

         while(myFile.good()){

            getline(myFile , line);

            //break line into tokens using istringstream
             std::istringstream hasTokens(line);

            //reload the vector of tokens for each line
            while(hasTokens)
            {
                std::string substring;
                if(! getline(hasTokens, substring,','))
                    break;
                tokenVector.push_back(substring);

            }

             otherFileWritingFunction(tokenVector[0], tokenVector[2], tokenVector[4]);    

             tokenVector.clear();
             hasTokens.str(std::string());

        }//end while
    }//end if is_open

This code works, but its not correct because I should only have to instantiate isstringstream once (I think). If I try "hasTokens.str(line)" for each iteration using just the original instantiation of hasTokens, as some example have suggested, it does not work, so I would really appreciate a suggestion.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Nope, your worries are misplaced. Create a new stream object when you need it, and dispose of it when you're done. That's the spirit of C++. An object for each purpose, and a purpose for each object (misquoting Frank Herbert). There's nothing "expensive" about constructing a string stream that wouldn't also happen when you reassign the string data of an existing string stream.

Your code is very noisy and redundant, though. The standard idiom goes like this:

std::string line;
while (std::getline(infile, line))
{
    std::istringstream iss(line);

    std::string token; 
    while (iss >> token) { /* do stuff */ }
}

Compressed version (some would call this abuse):

for (std::string line; std::getline(infile, line); )
{
    std::istringstream iss(line);

    for (std::string token; iss >> token; ) { /* ... */ }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, thanks for pointing that out –  Miek Dec 14 '11 at 18:15
    
+1 But you might point out that your solution also uses the correct end conditions, and never tries to use an input value without first having verified that the input succeeded. That wasn't the case for his initial code. –  James Kanze Dec 14 '11 at 18:19
    
@JamesKanze: To be honest, I didn't read through the OP's entire code... :-S I hope he can derive some use from what I said, without this trying to be the be-all-end-all solution. –  Kerrek SB Dec 14 '11 at 18:33
    
It looks like the same object can be used over and over. I neglected to clear out the object each time (hasTokens.clear()). Once I stumble onto that, it worked. Thanks for the help. –  Miek Dec 14 '11 at 18:35
    
@Miek: Yes, you can. No, you shouldn't. –  Kerrek SB Dec 14 '11 at 18:43

The second std::istringstream declaration has an entirely different scope and is being constructed in each iteration so hasTokens.str(std::string()); has no effect.

You could reuse the same object if you did hasTokens.str(line) in the while loop instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I tired that, and it was not woring –  Miek Dec 14 '11 at 18:21
    
You were right! I just had to use hasTokens.clear(); after each iteration. It would not work because it was retaining EOF info thanks –  Miek Dec 14 '11 at 18:33
    
hasTokens.clear() resets the bit flags for eof, fail, good, & bad. However @Kerrek SB has good advice on keeping things concise, robust, and well-formed. I gave you the minimum answer he gave you the ideal answer. –  AJG85 Dec 14 '11 at 18:50

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