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I need several global pointers to be shared among a few files - the pointers are essentially arrays of double whose lengths are only determined at runtime.

I include here the pieces of the code that caused the issue. This is not the exact code, but it illustrates all the points precisely:

foo.h

#ifndef FOOH
#define FOOH

/* ------------------
COMMON VARIABLES
---------------------*/

// create_bundles.c
extern double *all_bundle;

/* ------------------
COMMON FUNCTIONS
---------------------*/

// create_bundles.c
void create_bundles(int num_firm);

// memory_allocation.c
void allocate_memory(int num_firm, int num_bundle);
void clean_memory(void);
#endif

create_bundles.c

#include "foo.h"
extern double *all_bundle;

void create_bundles(int num_firm) {
int i;
    for (i = 0; i < num_firm; i++) {
        all_bundle[i] = 1
    }

memory_allocation.c

#include "foo.h"

// create_bundles.c
double *all_bundle = NULL;

void allocate_memory(int num_firm, int num_bundle) {
    all_bundle = calloc(num_bundle * num_firm, sizeof(double));
}
void clean_memory(void) {
    free(all_bundle);
}

main.c

#include "foo.h"
void main(int num_firm, int num_bundle) {
    allocate_memory(num_firm, num_bundle);
    create_bundles(num_firm);
    clean_memory();
} 

What happened is that if I print out all_bundle[i] it'll all be 0, and then it'll give me a segmentation error.

Why the error and how to fix it?

share|improve this question
3  
Without seeing all your code it's not clear. But having globals shared across files doesn't cause any problems. I would double check that your functions that init the pointers actually modify the pointer (take argument of **double) and not just modify a local copy of the pointer –  TJD Dec 14 '11 at 18:46
    
Did you make sure you inlcude foo.h (or any file that declares all_bundle) to all modules (*.c) using all_bundle? –  alk Dec 14 '11 at 19:39
    
I would check what value num_firm has. It should be easy to find the problem with debugge. –  Sulthan Dec 14 '11 at 19:41
    
It is not the way extern works I guess. You don't need the definition of extern pointer in the header file. You use extern keyword when you want to inform the compiler that this variable exists somewhere in the memory pool. In this case in `create_bundles.c' you have to tell compiler that all_boundle isn't in fact undefined. –  thim Dec 14 '11 at 19:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is not in global pointer, but something else. Keep looking for the problem in your common code. I hope you are trying to print contents of all_bundle array before calling clean_memory. I have edited your code a little bit and it works great without any segmentation errors and prints 1.0000. Here it is, take a look:
foo.h:

#ifndef FOOH
#define FOOH

// create_bundles.c
extern double *all_bundle;

// create_bundles.c
void create_bundles(int num_firm);

// memory_allocation.c
void allocate_memory(int num_firm, int num_bundle);
void clean_memory(void);

#endif

memory_allocation.c:

#include <stdlib.h>

#include "foo.h"

double *all_bundle = 0;

void allocate_memory(int num_firm, int num_bundle) {
    all_bundle = calloc(num_bundle * num_firm, sizeof(double));
}
void clean_memory(void) {
    free(all_bundle);
}

create_bundles.c:

#include "foo.h"

void create_bundles(int num_firm) {
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < num_firm; i++) {
        all_bundle[i] = 1;
    }
}

main.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include "foo.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    allocate_memory(100, 1);
    create_bundles(100);

    {
        int i;
        for(i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
            printf("%f\n", all_bundle[i]);
    }

    clean_memory();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right. The problem was something else. It was a red herring. Thanks. –  user18115 Dec 17 '11 at 7:05

Have a header file to access the memory (i.e. add stuff to it, remove stuff from it, readf bits of it, etc). Have the corresponding .c (or .cpp if that fancies you) to do the magic. And then use static to define the memory.

This is a simple and easy solution to your problem and also enables you to change the implementation if it is required to do so.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not understand this answer. Can you help look at the code in the question and specify what you mean? Thanks. –  user18115 Dec 14 '11 at 19:26

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