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Throughout this site I commonly see people answer questions with such answers as "it works like that because the compiler replaces [thing] with [other thing]", so my question is, how do people know/learn this? Where can I learn these things?

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You need to know the secret handshake. –  ChaosPandion Dec 14 '11 at 18:46
    
dotnetperls.com/compiler –  D Stanley Dec 14 '11 at 18:46
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C# Language Specification and Reflectors –  Tim Schmelter Dec 14 '11 at 18:49
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ildasm will let you learn a lot about what the C# compiler produces, as you easily experiment and see what IL it emits. You might also check out Roslyn, whose API reveals the perspective from which the compiler sees C# code. blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2011/10/19/… –  Dan Bryant Dec 14 '11 at 18:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The most definitive source for how the C# compiler interprets code is the C# language spec.

Also the following blogs provide a lot of more insight into the C# language. Mandatory reading for anyone who wants to become an expert in the language

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I'd add Eric Lippert's blog to that. –  GSerg Dec 14 '11 at 18:49
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@GSerg I often think of the C# lang spec as "what the compiler is doing" and Eric's blog as "why the compiler is doing what it's doing" –  JaredPar Dec 14 '11 at 18:49

One technique is to compile your code, and then decompile it using tools such as ILSpy. Using such a tool, you can view the raw IL and see for yourself what the compiler produces.

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In addition to the other answers, I'd like to mention that LINQPad is my favorite tool for inspecting IL for quick snippets.

You can type a snippet of code, and immediately see the IL.
It's by far the easiest tool to use, and you can make changes and see the results instantly.

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In addition to checking the Intermediate Language and reading the language specification, please allow me to add "CLR via C#" by Jeffrey Richter. Microsoft Press Library of Congress Control Number: 2009943026. This reference is amazing, and goes into complete detail on what's happening under the covers.

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Niklaus Wirth's book Compiler Construction (PDF) is an introduction to the theory and the techniques of compiler construction. It gives you a general idea of what a compiler is and what it does.

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