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I build a FB app which does the following:

1) redirect initial request to FB, in order to authenticate/login, as follows:

https://www.facebook.com/dialog/oauth?client_id=MYAPPID&redirect_uri=http://localhost:8080/FB/servlet&scope=read_stream&response_type=code

2) in servlet, get the "code" parameter (which is the signed_request?):

 String signedReq = request.getParameter("code");

// the String retrieved from the code parameter is:
//3DaDJXq1Mlsq67GbeudlUxu7bY5Um4hSJlwzoPCHhp4.eyJpdiI6Ikc1ODNuRjZXbnhCb0hUV1FEMVNTQUEifQ._iXKxSGiNHfc-i5fRO35ny6hZ03DcLwu4bpAkslqoZk6OfxW5Uo36HwhUH2Gwm2byPh5rVp2kKCNS6EoPEZJzsqdhZ_MhuUD8WGky1dx5J-qNOUqQK9uNM4HG4ziSgFaAV8mzMGeUeRo8KSL0tcKuq

//This parameter contains '#_= _' at the end in the actual "code" but i am not able to get it through the request.getParameter("code");This is a java web app.

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Are you sure that parameter name is "code" and not "signed_request"? –  narek.gevorgyan Dec 14 '11 at 19:12
    
Ok, i got it now! –  narek.gevorgyan Dec 14 '11 at 19:15

1 Answer 1

Copied from the Facebook API's OAuth Page

With this code in hand, you can proceed to the next step, app authentication, to gain the access token you need to make API calls. In order to authenticate your app, you must pass the authorization code and your app secret to the Graph API token endpoint - along with the exact same redirect_uri used above - at https://graph.facebook.com/oauth/access_token. The app secret is available from the Developer App and should not be shared with anyone or embedded in any code that you will distribute (you should use the client-side flow for these scenarios).

https://graph.facebook.com/oauth/access_token? client_id=YOUR_APP_ID&redirect_uri=YOUR_URL& client_secret=YOUR_APP_SECRET&code=THE_CODE_FROM_ABOVE

If your app is successfully authenticated and the authorization code from the user is valid, the authorization server will return the access token.

So yeah, This is pretty standard for OAuth. Grab a success code, punch it into the above url (with the appropriate client_id, client_secret, and a redirect_uri) and you should be cash. You'll get an access token back, and it's party time from there.

Read that Facebook API article. It was pretty informative. If you have questions about it, I'd be happy to help.

Good luck :)

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My question is not how to go ahead with the calling graph api.//This parameter contains '#_= _' at the end in the actual "code" but i am not able to get it through the request.getParameter("code");This is a java web app. That is if i call String signedReq = request.getParameter("code"); i am getting code without the last '#_= _' substring but i can see that in the url. –  user1098255 Dec 14 '11 at 19:23
    
That's odd...Unless I am mistaken, that means that FB is sending you a non-URL safe code. I assume that you've tried continuing both without the aforementioned substring and with the substring appended on manually? Which one works? If the "code" needs the substring to work, does FB ever return a code that doesn't end with that exact substring? you may need to add it to the end manually. That said, request.getParameter()'s JavaDoc doesn't mention any case where it won't return you the whole value of the parameter. All bets are off though if the value isn't URL safe... –  Cody S Dec 14 '11 at 20:19
    
Did a little Googling. The stuff after a '#' is called a Fragment Identifier. HttpServletRequest makes no mention of them in their JavaDoc. So that's odd... –  Cody S Dec 14 '11 at 20:21
    
Actually i did the quering the FB server with the substring that is by adding manually it worked but without adding that, code is failing the validation. Yes as you said FB is sending me a non-URL safe code i don't know how it is happening ? –  user1098255 Dec 15 '11 at 1:22

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