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I have this program which takes a array of words and asks user to type a sentence which has each of the word from the array:

@words = qw(Hi world thanks);
foreach $word (@words) 
{
        print "Enter a line with word:$word\n";
        chomp($input = <STDIN>);
        if($input=~/$word/i) 
        {
                print "Great\n";
        } else {
                print "Incorrect. Type a line containing $word\n";
        }
}

If the user types a input with the word, it works fine. But if he doesn't It only prints the error message and moves to the next word. I want it it prompt the user to re-enter inputs for the same word. But how ? I tried next it did not work.

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3 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can use a redo in this case to restart the current iteration.

foreach my $word (@words) 
{
        print "Enter a line with word:$word\n";
        chomp($input = <STDIN>);
        if($input=~/$word/i) 
        {
                print "Great\n";
        } else {
                print "Incorrect. Type a line contaning $word\n";
                redo; # restart current iteration.
        }
}

A less-recommended alternative is to use a goto:

foreach my $word (@words)
{
        INPUT:print "Enter a line with word:$word\n";
        chomp($input = <STDIN>);
        if($input=~/$word/i)
        {
                print "Great\n";
        } else {
                print "Incorrect. Type a line contaning $word\n";
                goto INPUT;
        }
}
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1  
Thanks. It works. perl was so many ways to doing things. –  Akki Javed Dec 14 '11 at 19:28
    
I'd vote for redo. –  David W. Dec 14 '11 at 21:05
2  
Holy cow, 14 upvotes for redo? Long time since I've seen such overwhelming acclaim in the perl tag. –  TLP Dec 15 '11 at 1:00
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I would create an infinite while loop to exit out of:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @words = qw(Hi world thanks);
foreach my $word (@words) {
  print "Enter a line with word: $word\n";
  while (1) {
    chomp( my $input = <STDIN> );
    if( $input=~/$word/i )  {
      print "Great\n";
      last;
    } else {
      print "Incorrect. Type a line contaning $word\n";
    }
  }
}

of course I would probably separate the logic of each individual word into a sub, then loop over that:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @words = qw(Hi world thanks);
get_word($_) for @words;

sub get_word {
  my $word = shift or die "Need a word";
  print "Enter a line with word: $word\n";
  while (1) {
    chomp( my $input = <STDIN> );
    if( $input=~/$word/i )  {
      print "Great\n";
      last;
    } else {
      print "Incorrect. Type a line contaning $word\n";
    }
  }
}
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While redo is definitely cuter, here's a version with while ... continue. It relies on an inner loop that is exited only when the right word is entered, and prints a correction for each wrong answer.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @words = qw(Hi world thanks);
foreach my $word (@words) {
    print "Enter a line with word: $word\n";
    while (my $input = <>) {
        last if $input =~ /$word/;
    } continue {
        print "Incorrect. Type a line contaning $word\n";
    }
    print "Great\n";
}

Note that chomp is not required in this case.

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I guess that chomp really isn't needed in any of these, but only because the regex isn't anchored, and it isn't an eq comparison. –  Joel Berger Dec 15 '11 at 4:54
    
@JoelBerger Hence "in this case". –  TLP Dec 15 '11 at 5:15
    
oh, I thought you meant in your case. Gotcha –  Joel Berger Dec 15 '11 at 13:42
    
@JoelBerger I guess it might be better practice to include chomp, in case someone later tries to use the code for something else, which does need chomp. I've just got this thing for simplifying code. –  TLP Dec 16 '11 at 8:09
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