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I have several objects with a few properties that are common to all of them. For example:

Object A is of type X and it has 10 properties

Object B is of type Y and it has 15 properties

Object C is of type Z and it has 7 properties

All of these objects have "name", "signature" and "checksum" properties in common. I'm trying to create a static helper method that can accept an object of any type that contains "name", "signature" and "checksum" properties. Is that possible or do I actually need three different methods (one to accept an object of each type)?

EDIT - For what it's worth, I failed to mention that these objects are exposed to me via a web service.

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1  
This is called "structural typing" and is present in languages like Scala. C#4 introduces dynamic (which is not structural typing), and I have no idea if C# has other tricks up it's sleeve for this... the standard approach is to add the interfaces as appropriate. –  user166390 Dec 14 '11 at 19:43

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am going to assume that since these obejcts are exposed via a web service, then you have no control over the definition of the object. They are what they are and you can't have them inherit from a common base class, or interface. With that constraint to the problem, you really have only two options.

If you are using C# 4.0 or later you can use the new dynamic type. This basically is an object reference that does not do any type evalutation until run time. So if a property or method you use on the dynamic type does not exist your going to get a run time error rather than a error during compliation.

The other otpion is going to simply take a reference to type Object and use reflection to manipulate properties and methods. A lot of potential ugly there.

I you are not using C# 4+ then I think I would go with the three seperate methods. While you might duplicate some code, I would rather have that than a bunch of complex hard to follow reflection calls that you would have to use in c# 3.5-

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Thanks very much! Those are the suggestions that I was looking for! –  user685869 Dec 15 '11 at 19:01

You should move those properties to a common base class or interface and use that.

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Doh! I forgot to mention that these objects are exposed to me via a web service (SOAP). Does that change your suggestion? –  user685869 Dec 14 '11 at 19:24
    
How are you consuming the service? That shouldn't make a difference. –  SLaks Dec 14 '11 at 19:24
    
I'm using a client proxy that VS created when I setup the web reference. –  user685869 Dec 14 '11 at 19:26
2  
Nothing stopping you from editing the code VS generated, though I'd suggest using partial classes to avoid your code being lost in the event you want VS to regenerate the class. In that situation, you'll probably be better served with a common interface rather than a common base class. –  Brian Dec 14 '11 at 19:44

You have two good options. The first is inheritance:

public class CommonObject
{
    public string Name;
    public string Signature;
    public string Checksum;
}

public class X : CommonObject
{
    // other properties
}

public class Y : CommonObject
{
    // other properties
}

public class Z : CommonObject
{
    // other properties
}

public static void DoSomething(CommonObject o)
{
    // You can access these values
    if (o.Name == "" || o.Signature == "")
        o.Checksum = 0;
}

This can be powerful since you can make those properties virtual, and each class can override to handle them differently.

The second option is using an interface:

public class OtherClass
{
    public static void DoSomething(CommonObject o)
    {
        // code here
    }
}

public interface CommonObject
{
    string Name { get; }
    string Signature { get; }
    string Checksum { get; }
}

public class X : CommonObject
{
    private string _name = "";
    private string _signature = "";
    private string _checksum = "";

    string CommonObject.Name { get { return _name; } }
    string CommonObject.Signature { get { return _signature; } }
    string CommonObject.Checksum { get { return _checksum; } }
}
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The method cannot have an implementation in an interface declaration. It should read: static void DoSomething(CommonObject o); –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 14 '11 at 19:40
    
Technically it shouldn't go anywhere in the code I posted. He said he was using a static helper method. He'd put it in whatever class he wants. I added a dummy class to hold it. –  Trevor Elliott Dec 14 '11 at 19:48

It is possible... if you define a common base class containing the common methods, and make Objects A, B, and C subclasses of the base. Your static helper method can then use the base class as its parameter type, and any of the sub-types can be passed into it.

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For another option there is also of dynamic typing. Although this option should work for you, I would definitely try to use an interface or base class as the others have mentioned.

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an interface is your best option I believe,

public interface ISomeGoodNameForCommonProperies 
{
  string Name {get;set;}
  string Signature {get;set;}
  string Checksum {get;set;}
}

public class X : ISomeGoodNameForCommonProperies 
{
  string Name {get;set;}
  string Signature {get;set;}
  string Checksum {get;set;}
  ...
}

public class Y : ISomeGoodNameForCommonProperies 
{
  string Name {get;set;}
  string Signature {get;set;}
  string Checksum {get;set;}
  ...
}

public class Z : ISomeGoodNameForCommonProperies 
{
  string Name {get;set;}
  string Signature {get;set;}
  string Checksum {get;set;}
  ...
}

your helper method then, would take ISomeGoodNameForCommonProperies

public object MyHelperMethod(ISomeGoodNameForCommonProperies myObject)
{
  ...
}

inheritance would work of course, however I would avoid base classes unless it makes sense for the objects you are trying to create. the question you should be asking yourself, can X, Y, and Z be defined as some type of a different object O? if so go ahead and create O and inherent from it. If these 3 properties you have in common are not enough to define a logical entity but they need to be grouped together for practical reason, an interface is your best option.

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You can use inheritance.

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There are two approaches to this problem:

Create a base class that has all these common properties and derive the others from it.

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Signature { get; set; }
    public int Checksum { get; set; }
}

public class ClassX : MyBaseClass
{
    // Add the other properties here
}

public class ClassY : MyBaseClass
{
    // Add the other properties here
}

public class ClassZ : MyBaseClass
{
    // Add the other properties here
}

Your helper method will have a parameter of type MyBaseClass:

public void MyHelperMethod(MyBaseClass obj)
{
    // Do something with obj.Name, obj.Siganture and obj.Checksum
}

It would also be a good idea to place the helper method in MyBaseClass, but without parameters, since now it can access the properties directly:

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Signature { get; set; }
    public int Checksum { get; set; }

    public void CreateChecksum() // Your helper method
    {
        Checksum = Name.GetHashCode() ^ Signature.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Then you can call it directly from your objects:

objA.CreateChecksum();
objB.CreateChecksum();
objB.CreateChecksum();

Or define an interface that your three classes implement:

public interface IMyInterface
{
    string Name { get; set; }
    string Signature { get; set; }
    int Checksum { get; set; }
}

public class ClassX : IMyInterface
{
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Signature { get; set; }
        public int Checksum { get; set; }
    // Add the other properties here
}

public class ClassY : IMyInterface
{
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Signature { get; set; }
        public int Checksum { get; set; }
    // Add the other properties here
}

public class ClassZ : IMyInterface
{
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Signature { get; set; }
        public int Checksum { get; set; }
    // Add the other properties here
}

Your helper method will have a parameter of type IMyInterface:

public void MyHelperMethod(IMyInterface obj)
{
    // Do something with obj.Name, obj.Siganture and obj.Checksum
}

You can call MyHelperMethod like this

MyHelperMethod(objA);
MyHelperMethod(objB);
MyHelperMethod(objC);
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