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Given let ra = ResizeArray<int> ():

Seq.forall (fun i ->
                    let q = i % 2
                    if 0 = q then ra.Add i
                    true ) <| seq { 1..10 }

If I do that, ra.Count returns 5.

Seq.forall (fun i ->
                    let q = i % 2
                    if 0 = q then ra.Add i
                    0 = q ) <| seq { 1..10 }

If I do that, ra.Count returns 0.

So, what, unless every iteration of the lambda function evaluates to true, then effectively none of the code in the function is executed, or what??

What's going on, here?

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8  
Quoting the docs: "If any application returns false then the overall result is false and no further elements are tested." –  ildjarn Dec 14 '11 at 20:12
1  
forall + side effects is a bad combo. –  Mauricio Scheffer Dec 14 '11 at 21:02
    
@MauricioScheffer Depends on the situation. In this case (i.e. briefly demonstrating functionality), it was eminently practical. –  MiloDC Dec 14 '11 at 22:35
1  
use Seq.iter. seq { 1..10 } |> Seq.filter (fun x -> x % 2 = 0) |> Seq.iter (fun x -> ra.Add x) or seq { 1..10 } |> Seq.iter (fun x -> if x % 2 = 0 then ra.Add x) –  BLUEPIXY Dec 14 '11 at 23:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You use a value of "false" to cease the Seq.forall function from processing further elements.

Since 1 % 2 = 0 is false, this stops the evaluation on the first iteration.

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Thanks, didn't catch that in the docs. I need the list to be fully iterated over, guess I'll have to use Seq.map then Seq.forall ? –  MiloDC Dec 14 '11 at 20:28
4  
@MiloDC - Have you considered Seq.iter? –  Joel Mueller Dec 14 '11 at 20:43
    
@JoelMueller Yes, but Seq.iter returns unit; I need to know whether any of the lambda functions evaluated to false. Seq.map |> Seq.forall is working for me. –  MiloDC Dec 14 '11 at 22:30

The following approach would be more functional:

let (anyOdds, evens) =
    seq {1..10}
    |> Seq.fold (fun (anyOdds, xs) x ->
        if x % 2 = 0 then
            anyOdds, x :: xs
        else true, xs) (false, [])

Feel comfortable to ditch ResizeArray's in favor of F# lists they are generally efficient unless you have specific requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
Guys, my example was typed up real fast, just to demonstrate functionality. I'm not actually implementing a function that looks for even numbers. :) (My actual function is radically different and totally unrelated in purpose.) –  MiloDC Dec 15 '11 at 3:54
2  
I understand, but it doesn't mean you can't do it in a functional way without side-effecting. –  David Grenier Dec 15 '11 at 14:52
    
Sure, I simply wasn't interested in anal-retentively tailoring my example (which makes sense in the context of my actual program) to eliminate side effects. –  MiloDC Dec 27 '11 at 23:30

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