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Right now I have two .java files.
The Main.java:

public class Main {
    static int integer = 15;
    NeedInteger need = new NeedInteger();
}

and the NeedInteger.java

public class NeedInteger {
    System.out.println(integer);
}

This is of course very simplified, but is there any way I can accomplish this?

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1  
Pass in the variable to the class constructor. You need to be more specific regarding your real needs. –  Dave Newton Dec 14 '11 at 20:56
    
Let's say I have about 2000 instances of the second class, which all need to access a three-dimensional String array created in the Main class. –  BarrensZeppelin Dec 14 '11 at 20:58
    
I assume you mean something other than String[][][] array = Main.threeDimensionalStringArray; Are you asking how to reference the static variable from other classes or something else? –  Gray Dec 14 '11 at 21:26

6 Answers 6

Add a constructor to NeedInteger (and optionally a member if you need to also store it):

public class NeedInteger {

    private int integer;

    public NeedInteger(int integer) {
        this.integer = integer;
        System.out.println(integer);
    }
}

Then pass your value when you create the instance:

public class Main {
    static int integer = 15;
    NeedInteger need = new NeedInteger(integer);
}
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This seems like a great idea, but wouldn't this store my huge array in every single instance of the class? –  BarrensZeppelin Dec 14 '11 at 21:01
    
Since arrays are references, it only copies the reference, not the actual contents. So it's not a problem. –  Tudor Dec 14 '11 at 21:02
    
@user1098680 No, if you passed an array reference it would have an array reference, not a copy of the array. –  Dave Newton Dec 14 '11 at 21:02

You would have to do some bad juju moves (like using a global variable) or pass it to the constructor.

NOTE: your

public class NeedInteger {
    System.out.println(integer);
}

has no method in it. I would recommend all this to be rewritten as such:

public Class NeedInteger {
    NeedInteger(int integer) {
    System.out.println(integer);
    }
}

If you really want the work to be done on construction.

EDIT: From your comment above.

Instead, have the class structured so:

public Class NeedStringArray {
       NeedStringArray(String[][][] stringArr) {
           //work with String array here
       }
}

That has no real additional overhead, since the actual array will not be passed, but only a reference to it. You WILL likely want to set the array to be final or something, to avoid it being edited in the NeedStringArray constructors.

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integer is private, so it cannot be accessed by NeedInteger. you'll have to make it public or use a setter or getter and you'll need to use Main.integer since it's static.

Generally, you set in the Constructor.

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so if I did public static integer, my new instance would be able to access it with Main.integer? –  BarrensZeppelin Dec 14 '11 at 21:02
    
yes. static means there is only one instance, so you do Main.integer. if it is not variable you can Main i = new Main(); and i.integer. –  tehdoommarine Dec 14 '11 at 21:03
    
Perfect this seems like the easiest solution. –  BarrensZeppelin Dec 14 '11 at 21:05
    
docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/classvars.html - more info about static variables. –  tehdoommarine Dec 14 '11 at 21:09
    
It is generally better to use a public accessor method instead of making the field itself public. –  increment1 Dec 14 '11 at 21:11

Pass in the variable to the class constructor.

An array reference would be just that--a reference.

Or you could pass in the class itself, or use a static (meh).

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Per your comment I'd say you can either host your array in a singleton or as others suggested have the second class accept the reference to the array in the constructor. You can then use Dependency Injection framework (e.g. Guice) to get wire them up

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As many have answered, the correct method is to pass the value in to the constructor of the new class.

If for some reason you cannot do that, then you can use a public static accessor method in Main to access the value (this would be slightly better than just making the field public).

E.g.

public class Main
{
  private static int integer = 15;

  public static int getInteger()
  {
    return integer;
  }
}

public class NeedInteger
{
  public NeedInteger()
  {
    int integer = Main.getInteger();
  }
}
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