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I have been writing a palindrome finder in C++ and I have succeeded in writing one that is.... basic to say the least.

I am looking simply to increase the runspeed of the program, right now it takes about ~1m 5s to run a test for palindromes / 2 word palindromes on a 1500 word wordlist using the functions that I have. I would like to try running it on a much larger file but fail to see where I can optimize further?

Any help would be appreciated: P.S. This is not for school, just for leisure.

#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>
#include <vector>
#include <fstream>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

bool isPal(string);

int main() {

vector<string> sVec;
vector<string> sWords;
vector<string> sTwoWords1;
vector<string> sTwoWords2;
char myfile[256]="/home/Damien/Test.txt";
ifstream fin;
string str;
fin.open(myfile);
    if(!fin){ 
        cout << "fin failed";
        return 0;
    }
while(fin){

    fin >> str;
    sWords.push_back(str);
    if(!fin){
        break;
    }
    if(isPal(str)){
      sVec.push_back(str);
    }
    else{
        getline(fin, str);
    }
}
    reverse(sVec.begin(), sVec.end());
    for(int i =0; i < sVec.size(); i++){
        cout << sVec[i] << " is a Palindrome " <<endl;
    }

    // Test 2
    for(int i=0; i<sWords.size(); i++){
        for(int j=(i+1); j<sWords.size(); j++){
            str = sWords[i]+sWords[j]; 
            if(isPal(str)){
                sTwoWords1.push_back(sWords[i]);
                sTwoWords2.push_back(sWords[j]);
            }
        }
    }
fin.close();
for(int i=0; i<sTwoWords1.size(); i++){
    cout << sTwoWords1[i] << " and " << sTwoWords2[i] << " are palindromic. \n";
}
return 0;
}


bool isPal(string& testing) {
    return std::equal(testing.begin(), testing.begin() + testing.size() / 2, testing.rbegin());
}
share|improve this question
1  
You could cut down on all that useless copying of std::strings. Also, this should be on CodeReview.SE. –  Xeo Dec 14 '11 at 21:08
    
Did you try profiling this program? –  dasblinkenlight Dec 14 '11 at 21:10
    
I'm almost sure loop inside loop is problem. Could you tell how long on average a word is? –  kilotaras Dec 14 '11 at 21:12
    
Right now I'm just using a small dictionary of 2-4 letter words. It's my goal to move up to a larger wordfile of about 170k words between 1 and 10 letters (official scrabble dictionary). –  HunderingThooves Dec 14 '11 at 21:18
    
The goal is to get it to work with this file: filedropper.com/ospd3 –  HunderingThooves Dec 14 '11 at 21:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're doing a lot of unnecessary work to test if it is a palindrome. Just use std::equal:

#include <algorithm>

bool isPal(const string& testing) {
    return std::equal(testing.begin(), testing.begin() + testing.size() / 2, testing.rbegin());
}

This will iterate from the beginning of the string to the middle and from the end of the string to the middle and compare the characters as it goes. I can't remember who showed me this, but I didn't think of it.

Edit: I learned it from Cubbi in another question about palindromes.

share|improve this answer
    
Neat use of std::equal! –  Pubby Dec 14 '11 at 21:12
    
@Pubby yes, I would never have thought of it. Well maybe, but I didn't. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 14 '11 at 21:14
    
For some reason it doesn't matter where I go, but it seems like every single solution I use is from Cubbi –  HunderingThooves Dec 14 '11 at 21:14

So i did some testing. In your approach Test2 takes long time.

Data: 2000 random 20 chars strings.

Your solution: 2500 ms. Seth Carnegie's: 500 ms.

Though i believe you have to multiply those by 2, because s+v can be palindrome while v+s isnt.

Idea: suppose we have a word abcd. Other words then can be palyndromes with this one are only cba and dcba. Lets check if we have those present.

...    
#include <set>
using namespace std;

bool isPal(const string&);

int main() {
    ...
    set<string> rWords;
    ...
    while(fin){

        fin >> str;

        sWords.push_back(str);

        if(!fin){
            break;
        }
        reverse(str.begin(), str.end());//add reversed str to rWords
        rWords.insert(str);
        reverse(str.begin(), str.end());

        ...
    }

    ...

    // Test 2
    for(int i = 0; i<sWords.size(); ++i)
        for(int l = 0; l<sWords[i].length(); ++l)
            if(isPal(sWords[i].substr(sWords[i].length()-l)))
            {
                string s = sWords[i].substr(0,sWords[i].length()-l);
                set<string>::iterator it = rWords.find(sWords[i].substr(0,sWords[i].length()-l));
                if(it != rWords.end())
                {
                    string s = *it;
                    reverse(s.begin(), s.end());
                    if(s == sWords[i])//isPoly to itself
                        continue;
                    sTwoWords1.push_back(sWords[i]);
                    sTwoWords2.push_back(s);
                }
            }
    ...
    return 0;
}

bool isPal(const string& testing) {
    return std::equal(testing.begin(), testing.begin() + testing.size() / 2, testing.rbegin());
}

time: 15ms

share|improve this answer

A simple recursive approach

bool isPali(char s[], int i);

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

char s[] ={"pop"};
if (isPali(s, 3))  //string length
    cout << "is Palindrom!" << endl;
return 0;
}

bool isPali(char s[], int length) {

if (length < 2)
    return true;
if (s[0] != s[length - 1]) return false;
return isPali(s + 1, length - 2);

} 
share|improve this answer
1  
have you profiled it? iteration is bound to be way faster due to code/data locality and CPU pipelining. Not to mention you have just raised the resource complexity of the algorithm from O(1) to O(n/2) for no good reason –  sehe Dec 14 '11 at 21:43
    
@sehe No, I didn't.Did you mean that using the same algorithm (advance the pointer and decrement the length) but using a loop is better? Thanks for your nice comment –  Sleiman Jneidi Dec 14 '11 at 21:54
    
If the compiler performs tail-call optimization, this is a fine solution. –  David Brigada Dec 14 '11 at 21:57
    
@DavidBrigada I am not expert in C++,so what is tail-call optimization? –  Sleiman Jneidi Dec 14 '11 at 21:59
1  
If the last thing that happens in a function is a recursive call, then the compiler can perform an optimization where, instead of performing the actual function call, replaces its own stack frame with the new function call. Thus, the stack doesn't grow with repetitive recursive calls. This is considered the canonical way to perform iterative looping in most Lisp languages. –  David Brigada Dec 14 '11 at 22:01

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