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I am working on a localization project and using a least squares estimation to determine the location of a transmitter. I need a way to statistically characterize the "fitness" of my solution within my program, which could be used to tell me if I have a good answer, or I need additional measurements, or have bad data. I have read a bit about using the "Coefficient of Determination" or R-squared, but haven't been able to find any good examples. Any ideas on how to characterize whether I have a good solution, or need additional measurements would be much appreciated.

Thanks!

My code gives me the following outputs,

grid_lat and grid_lon correspond to latitude and longitude coordinates for the grid of possible target locations

grid_lat = [[ 38.16755799  38.16755799  38.16755799  38.16755799  38.16755799
  38.16755799]
  [ 38.17717199  38.17717199  38.17717199  38.17717199  38.17717199
    38.17717199]
  [ 38.186786    38.186786    38.186786    38.186786    38.186786    38.186786  ]
  [ 38.1964      38.1964      38.1964      38.1964      38.1964      38.1964    ]
  [ 38.20601401  38.20601401  38.20601401  38.20601401  38.20601401
    38.20601401]
  [ 38.21562801  38.21562801  38.21562801  38.21562801  38.21562801
    38.21562801]
  [ 38.22524202  38.22524202  38.22524202  38.22524202  38.22524202
    38.22524202]]

grid_lon = [[-75.83805812 -75.83006167 -75.82206522 -75.81406878 -75.80607233
    -75.79807588]
  [-75.83805812 -75.83006167 -75.82206522 -75.81406878 -75.80607233
    -75.79807588]
  [-75.83805812 -75.83006167 -75.82206522 -75.81406878 -75.80607233
    -75.79807588]
  [-75.83805812 -75.83006167 -75.82206522 -75.81406878 -75.80607233
    -75.79807588]
  [-75.83805812 -75.83006167 -75.82206522 -75.81406878 -75.80607233
    -75.79807588]
  [-75.83805812 -75.83006167 -75.82206522 -75.81406878 -75.80607233
    -75.79807588]
  [-75.83805812 -75.83006167 -75.82206522 -75.81406878 -75.80607233
    -75.79807588]]

grid_error corresponds to how "good" of a solution each point is. If we have an error of 0.0, we have a perfect solution. Grid Error is computed for each point on the grid to each measurement position (the tracks in the measurement below). Each measurement position has an estimated range to the transmitter. The "error" corresponds to the estimated range to transmitter from the measurement, minus the actual range calculated between the measurement range location and the grid point. The lower the error, the greater the chance we are close to the actual transmitter location

# Calculate distance between every grid point and every measurement in meters 
measured_distance = spatial.distance.cdist(grid_ecef_array, measurement_ecef_array,    'euclidean')

measurement_error = [pow((measurement - estimated_distance),2) for measurement in measured_distance]

mean_squared_error = [numpy.sqrt(numpy.mean(measurement)) for measurement in measurement_error]

# Find minimum solution 
# Convert array of mean_squared_errors to 2D grid for graphing
N3, N4 = numpy.array(grid_lon).shape
grid_error = numpy.array(mean_squared_error).reshape((N3, N4))

grid_error = [[ 2.33608445  2.02805063  1.85638288  1.84620283  2.02757163  2.38035108]
  [ 1.73675429  1.40649524  1.21799211  1.06503271  1.27373554  1.74265406]
  [ 1.44967789  0.96835022  0.62667257  0.52804942  0.91189678  1.50067864]
  [ 1.70155286  1.24024402  0.9642869   1.00517531  1.32606411  1.81754752]
  [ 2.40218247  2.07449106  1.91044903  1.94272889  2.15511638  2.51683715]
  [ 3.29679348  3.05353929  2.93662134  2.95839307  3.11583615  3.39320682]
  [ 4.27303679  4.08195869  3.99203754  4.00926823  4.13247105  4.35378011]]

# Generate the 3D plot with the Z coordinate being the mean squared error estimate
plot3Dcoordinates(grid_lon, grid_lat, grid_error)

# Generic function using matplotlib to plot coordinates
def plot3Dcoordinates(X, Y, Z):
    fig = plt.figure()
    ax = Axes3D(fig)

    surf = ax.plot_surface(X, Y, Z, rstride=1, cstride=1, cmap=cm.jet,
          linewidth=0, antialiased=False)

    fig.colorbar(surf, shrink=0.5, aspect=5)

Here is an example image of processing the algorithm on a much larger grid. I can tell visually that I have a pretty good solution because the shape converges on a single minimum point(the solution) smoothly, looking kind of like an inverted witches hat. enter image description here

The second image shows all of the measurements and locations with the solution plotted on top, and the minumum point as the solution (red x).

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
What, exactly, is the concern? It seems like you answer your own question through grid_error. Your details and plots are great, but we don't know what your program is and how it works. We only see inputs and their outputs. –  Steve Tjoa Dec 15 '11 at 0:20
    
Steve- i can tell visually that I have a good answer, you see clean confidence intervals moving away from the red X, which relate directly to the increasing mean squared error as we move farther away from the target point. The challenge I am facing is how to determine that I have a good solution or not programatically without requiring a human observation –  Alex Dec 15 '11 at 2:53
    
Added some code (just above grid_error definition) to show how the error estimate is generated –  Alex Dec 15 '11 at 3:26

1 Answer 1

The closer R-squared is to 1.0, the better your fit is. Choose your own "good enough" threshold, I think typical thresholds are in the .92-.98 range.

share|improve this answer
    
Paul- I have not been able to find a good explanation of how R-squared relates to my data. For example, I know through experience developing this program that a good solution will have a clean inverted witches hat shape, with error values on surrounding grid points increasing in a linear manner as you move further away from the solution. I'm just not sure how the R-squared value explains this, and also a good forumla to use for R-squared given the test data above. Thanks! –  Alex Dec 15 '11 at 2:50
    
In your post, you already said you are doing a least squares estimate - see this page (mathworld.wolfram.com/CorrelationCoefficient.html), equation 22 gives an expression to compute R-squared, using variance components that can be computed during the least squares calculations. This page also shows some example fits with different data sets and corresponding values of R-squared. –  Paul McGuire Dec 15 '11 at 3:04

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