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I have a small collection of algorithms in Java for playing multiple turn-based games, such as TicTacToe, Othello, Checkers, etc. I do it using Java Generics (self-bounded types) to be able to use the same algorithms without having to change them specifically for each game. The reason why I use self-bounded types is not shown here, but is is needed for the Evaluation Functions.

public interface Game<GAME extends Game<GAME>> {
    GAME copy();
    int getCurPlayer();
    ...
}

public class TicTacToe implements Game<TicTacToe> {
    ...
    @Override
    public TicTacToe copy() {
        ...
    }
    @Override
    public int getCurPlayer() {
        ...
    }
    ...
}

Today, just for learning, I tried to move my Java code to C++, using C++ templates.

This was my approach, and obviously it didn't work.

Game.h

template <typename T>
class Game
{
    public:
        virtual T copy() const = 0;
        virtual int cur_player() const = 0;
        ...
};

TicTacToe.h

class TicTacToe : public Game<TicTacToe>
{
public:
    virtual TicTacToe copy() const;
    virtual int cur_player() const;
    ...
};

TicTacToe.cpp

TicTacToe TicTacToe::copy() {
    ...
}

int TicTacToe::cur_player() {
    ...
}

When I try to compile, the errors I get are:

out-of-line definition of 'copy' does not match any declaration in 'TicTacToe'

out-of-line definition of 'cur_player' does not match any declaration in 'TicTacToe'

... and the same for each of the other pure virtual functions.

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1  
You never state what didn't work. –  Puppy Dec 14 '11 at 22:42
    
It's not obvious at all why that wouldn't work. What is the problem you are having (compiler error?) –  antlersoft Dec 14 '11 at 22:44
    
There's no use for "self-bounding types" in Java. Your code works just as well with public interface Game<GAME> –  newacct May 9 at 21:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your definitions need to have const applied to them as well. The CRTP, as it's known in C++ (Curiously Recurring Template Pattern) is perfectly valid C++.

However, there's no need for virtual here, the CRTP is used to statically dispatch functions and automatically implement functionality.

template <typename T>
class Game
{
    T& crtp_cast() { return *static_cast<T*>(this); }
    const T& crtp_cast() const { return *static_cast<const T*>(this); }
public:
    T copy() const { return crtp_cast(); }
    int cur_player() const { return crtp_cast().cur_player(); }
    ...
};

Note that in this case, the derived class does not need to implement a "copy" function, as the copy constructor will automatically be called by "copy". However, in the general case, as templates are duck typed, it's unnecessary to do this kind of thing, and normally you'd just use a standard template. Unlike Java's Generics, C++'s templates have no relation to inheritance at all- the types you can instantiate with do not have to inherit from a common interface.

template<typename Game> void f(const Game& g) {
    std::cout << g.cur_player();
}
class X {
public:
    int cur_player() const { return 1; }
};
class Y {
public:
    int cur_player() const { return 2; }
};
int main() {
    f(X());
    f(Y());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it worked! You were right, I was just missing the const in the definitions. –  David Robles Dec 14 '11 at 22:51
    
The cast is not safe. –  newacct May 9 at 22:00

Rather than using generics/templates, I would just pass around a pointer-to-Game from copy and such and then dynamic cast it down if you really need to.

For example:

Game.h:

class Game
{
public:
    virtual Game* copy() const = 0;
    virtual int cur_player() const = 0;
    ...
};

TicTacToe.h:

class TicTacToe : public Game
{
public:
    virtual Game* copy() const;
    virtual int cur_player() const;
    ...
};

TicTacToe.cpp:

Game* TicTacToe::copy()
{
    ...
}

int TicTacToe::cur_player()
{
    ...
}

Create your game like this:

TicTacToe ttt;
Game* game = &ttt;
Game* nextGame = game->copy(); // this will call TicTacToe::copy

If you need to call TicTacToe specific methods, either add them to Game, or try downcasting:

TicTacToe* ttt = dynamic_cast<TicTacToe*>(game);
ttt->TTTSpecificMethod();
share|improve this answer
1  
Raw new and delete is really bad, and so is static_casting down, it should really be a dynamic_cast. –  Puppy Dec 14 '11 at 22:51
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I'm quite new to C++. I have done Java, Python and Ruby for 3-5 years, and a bit of C. But never C++. I'll be careful about cleaning up the allocated memory. And your approach sounds good. Maybe is not worth to use Templates if I can get the job done with one downcast like: static_cast<TicTacToe*>(game). –  David Robles Dec 14 '11 at 22:57
    
As DeadMG suggested, you should probably use a dynamic_cast. But I would definitely do all this without the templates if you can! :) –  arasmussen Dec 14 '11 at 22:58
    
@DeadMG, I believe I've addressed your concerns. Thanks for the advice. –  arasmussen Dec 14 '11 at 22:59
    
@wanstein: Templates are the way to go. Always use resource-managing classes to handle all resources- including memory. –  Puppy Dec 14 '11 at 23:32

Self-bounding generics (Java) is equalent with Curiously recurring template pattern(C++) via a few modifications.

template <class T>
class A
{
private:
  explicit A(A *temp) {}

public:
  explicit A() : A(static_cast<T*>(this)) {}
  virtual A* function(T *parameter) = 0;
};

class B final : public A<B>
{
public:
    B* function(B *parameter) { return new B(); }
};

class C final
{
};

class D final : public A<C>
{
public: // It occurs compile-time-error
  D* function(C *parameter) { return new D(); }
};

class E final : public A<E>
{
public: //"override" specifier will not be accepted due to signature does not match!
    E* function(E *parameter) override { return new E(); }
};

class F final : public A<B>
{
public: //You can also assign another relative type but type-self
    F* function(B *parameter) { return new F(); }
};

int main()
{
    return 0;
}
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