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Is calling [myObject performSelector:@selector(something) withObject:nil]; the same as just calling [myObject performSelector:@selector(something)];?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The only difference is signature of the method you intend on calling from the @selector. Use performSelector when the method takes no arguments, and use performSelector:withObject if the method takes a single argument of type id. Otherwise, they both do the exact same thing.

From the NSObject Protocol Reference:

Discussion

This method is the same as performSelector: except that you can supply an argument for aSelector. aSelector should identify a method that takes a single argument of type id. For methods with other argument types and return values, use NSInvocation.

As Chuck points out, this isn't really enforced (at least not at this point in time). The code below executed fine without any exceptions being thrown at me.

-(void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];    
    [self performSelector:@selector(foo) withObject:nil];
}
-(void)foo
{
    NSLog(@"foo!");
}

On the other hand, this version of the code did cause problems. So it doesn't work both ways.

-(void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];    
    [self performSelector:@selector(foo)];
}
-(void)foo:(id)myParameter
{
    NSLog(@"foo!");
}
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2  
This isn't enforced AFAIK. –  Chuck Dec 15 '11 at 1:49
1  
True - just did a quick test to verify that is the case. Will update the answer. –  Greg W Dec 15 '11 at 1:53
4  
Well, the second version clearly won't work because you're passing @selector(foo) rather than @selector(foo:), and the former method doesn't exist. But even if you do pass the right selector, it will invoke undefined behavior because the value of the method's parameter is never defined. –  Chuck Dec 15 '11 at 2:05
    
Ah, there you go. Thanks for the clarification. –  Greg W Dec 15 '11 at 2:32

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