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Is it possible to apply a blur to an HTML element(div & img)?

I am developing solely for the iPad so cross-browser compatibility is not an issue & I can use HTML5 CSS3 techniques.

I know how to blur text but this CSS doesn't blur the actual HTML element or its border:

text-shadow: 0 0 8px #000;
color: transparent;

I googled this but it doesn't blur the image in my browsers:

filter: blur(strength=50);
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2  
I'm stumped. +1. Would be curious to see some solutions. –  mrtsherman Dec 15 '11 at 4:15

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I saw a cool tutorial today about blurring content with CSS box-shadows, text-shadows, opacity, and color.

Here's the demo: http://tympanus.net/Tutorials/ItemBlur/

And the tutorial: http://tympanus.net/codrops/2011/12/14/item-blur-effect-with-css3-and-jquery/

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Very interesting. +1, can't do it with borders, though. –  bookcasey Dec 15 '11 at 4:28

Webkit has a property called -webkit-filter that allows for the techniques of blurring: -webkit-filter: blur(15px);

http://jsfiddle.net/danielfilho/KxWRA/

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This is a cool CSS property, you can see the current browser support here: caniuse.com/#feat=css-filters –  Jasper Jul 8 at 16:45

I think the best way is to layer the same image over itself a few times and test different positioning and opacities on the overlayed ones.

Here's the CSS that I came up with. Keep in mind I'm using the nth-child CSS3 selector (but you don't seem to have an issue with that):

img {
    width:300px;
    height:300px;
    position:absolute;
    opacity:0.2;
}

.container {
    position:relative;
    overflow:hidden;
    width:300px;
    height:300px;
}

img:nth-child(1) {
    opacity:1;   
}

img:nth-child(2) {
    left:2px;
    top:2px;
}

img:nth-child(3) {
    left:-2px;
    top:-2px;
}

img:nth-child(4) {
    left:-1px;
    top:-1px;
}

img:nth-child(5) {
    left:1px;
    top:1px;
}

HTML:

<div class="container">
    <img src="...">
    <img src="...">
    <img src="...">
    <img src="...">
    <img src="...">
</div>

The result is pretty promising.

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4  
That's interesting, but a markup nightmare. +1. –  bookcasey Dec 15 '11 at 4:24
    
Good job pal! About the markup, @bookcasey, yes, it is a nightmare, but we can just generate it dynamically from server side or with the help of JS/JQuery. So I think I'm going to be using this one. Thanks for the cool fiddle too ;) –  TIMINeutron 2 days ago

CSS does not have the ability to blur, besides techniques with text-shadow and box-shadow. But even with these, borders and images aren't able to be blurred.

This JavaScript library, however, can handle images.

Also, you may find this technique interesting. It's a neat illusion using pre-fabricated blurry images.

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This isn't strictly true as there is also box-shadow and the ability to layer a blurring image over the top without the need to refer to JS. –  isNaN1247 Dec 15 '11 at 4:31
    
I updated it, but feel free to edit! –  bookcasey Dec 15 '11 at 4:40
    
no thats a much fairer assessment :) +1 –  isNaN1247 Dec 15 '11 at 4:46

You can simply add this to your css, for an image:

In the following example, you'll be using a blur with 5 pixels of radius. And it is extremely important to use all vendor prefixes available, so it works on all browsers with this feature implemented, untile it comes to a "stable" version.

img{
  -webkit-filter: blur(5px);
  -moz-filter: blur(5px);
  -ms-filter: blur(5px);
  -o-filter: blur(5px);
  filter: blur(5px);
}
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Not supported in stable Firefox. –  Lucio Oct 4 at 5:50

With CSS3 we can easily adjust an image. But remember this does not change the image. It only displays the adjusted image.

See live demo and complete source code here

http://purpledesign.in/blog/adjust-an-image-using-css3-html5/

See the following code for more details.

To make an image gray:

img {
 -webkit-filter: grayscale(100%);
 -moz-filter: grayscale(100%);
}

To give a sepia look:

    img {
     -webkit-filter: sepia(100%);
    -moz-filter: sepia(100%);
}

To adjust brightness:

 img {
     -webkit-filter: brightness(50%);
     -moz-filter: brightness(50%);  
  }

To adjust contrast:

 img {
     -webkit-filter: contrast(200%);
     -moz-filter: contrast(200%);    
}

To Blur an image:

    img {
     -webkit-filter: blur(10px);
    -moz-filter: blur(10px);
  }
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I had to pretty thoroughly research this problem not too long ago and came up with an extremely flexible solution, though it may be overkill for some people's needs. I needed not only blurred images, but also a dynamic blur radius, overlay color, and overlay opacity for various kinds of images. I also needed to have the option of just blurring an image in a background with other elements overlayed on top of it. Here's the best cross-browser (and performant) solution I was able to create.

First, I'd have an SVG on hand, uninspiringly called blur.svg. It applies a blur filter and if you look closely, the stdDeviation (which sets the blur radius) is actually set programmatically from a passed in parameter to the URL requesting the asset.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE svg PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd">
<svg version="1.1" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
<filter id="blur">
<feGaussianBlur stdDeviation="#{params[:blur]}" />
</filter>
</svg>

Then I had an SCSS mixin that would allow one to add a blur overlay to any wrapper, with a customizable blur radius, overlay color, and overlay opacity.

@mixin background_blurred($blur_radius:4, $overlay_color:white, $overlay_opacity:0.6) {
  position: relative;
  .background_blurred {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    z-index: 1;
    filter: url('blur.svg#blur?blur=#{$blur_radius}');
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Blur(PixelRadius='#{$blur_radius}');
    transform: translateZ(0);
    &:after {
      content: '';
      width: 100%;
      height: 100%;
      position: absolute;
      top: 0;
      left: 0;
      background: $overlay_color;
      opacity: $overlay_opacity;
    }
  }
  .foreground {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 2;
  }
}

You may be wondering why I included a transform: translateZ(0);. The only effect that has is to force hardware acceleration on the render to keep things performant. You may also be wondering why there are no vendor prefixes. You can look up things like filter on CanIUse if you want, but I used autoprefixer on this project to worry about that stuff for me. And of course, why filter using this SVG, rather than with something like blur(4px)? Wouldn't that be easier? It would, but Firefox (as of writing) only supports the filter property with a URL.

Then you can apply the blur mixin to a wrapper class:

.my_wrapper_class {
  @include background_blurred(3, #f9f7f5, 0.7);
}

Notice that for this method, we have to use a class with a custom background set in a style attribute instead of an image tag with a src. You can tweak the background position and override the background size to your liking.

<div class="my_wrapper_class">
  <div class="background_blurred" style="background: url('URL OF IMAGE TO BLUR') no-repeat; background-position: 50% 0;"></div>
  <div class="foreground">
    <p>Stuff that should appear above the blurred background and not be blurred.</p>
  </div>
</div>
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