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Background:

Entity Framework 4, with SQL Server 2008

Problem:

I have a table Order. Each row has a column Timestamp.

The user can choose some time in past and I need to get the Order closest to the specified time, but that had occurred before the specified time. In other words, the last order before the specified time.

For example, if I have orders

2008-01-12
2009-04-17
2009-09-24
2010-11-02
2010-12-01
2011-05-16

and choose a date 2010-07-22, I should get the 2009-09-24 order, because that's the last order before the specified date.

var query = (from oData in db.OrderDatas
            where oData.Timestamp <= userTime
            orderby oData.Timestamp ascending
            select oData).Last();

This is closest to what I am trying. However, I am not sure how exactly does the Last operator work when translated to SQL, if it's translated at all.

Question:

Will this query fetch all data (earlier than userTime) and then take the last element, or will it be translated so that only one element will be returned from the database? My table can hold very large number of rows (100000+) so performance is an issue here.

Also, how would one retrieve the closest time in the database (not necessarily the earlier time)? In the example of 2010-07-22, one would get 2010-11-02, because it is closer to the date specified than 2009-09-24.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In general, if you're concerned about how LINQ behaves, you should check what does happen with the SQL. If you haven't worked out how to see how your LINQ queries are turned into SQL, that should be the very next thing you do.

As you noted in your comment, Last() isn't supported by LINQ to SQL so the same may be true for EF. Fortunately, it's easy to use First() instead:

var query = (from oData in db.OrderDatas
             where oData.Timestamp <= userTime
             orderby oData.Timestamp descending
             select oData).First();
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I just checked on msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb399342.aspx . Last operator is not supported. So I guess I'll stick with the descending/first combo. –  Kornelije Petak Dec 15 '11 at 7:43
    
@KornelijePetak: That would certainly be a deciding factor - will edit my post accordingly. –  Jon Skeet Dec 15 '11 at 7:56
    
@KornelijePetak: Note that that link is for LINQ to SQL, not EF. It may work with EF. It's probably worth trying and checking out the SQL. –  Jon Skeet Dec 15 '11 at 7:57
    
I know how to check the generated SQL in LINQ2SQL (with .Log), and I know how to check the ObjectQuery's CommandText, but that doesn't help me much in this case, because, when .First() operator is applied, I no longer have a ObjectQuery, but the single TSource. How can I read the generated SQL statement that is actually executed? –  Kornelije Petak Dec 15 '11 at 8:19
    
@KornelijePetak: I don't know offhand - but watching the queries in the profiler would certainly be one way. –  Jon Skeet Dec 15 '11 at 8:20

Question:

Will this query fetch all data (earlier than userTime) and then take the last element, or will it be translated so that only one element will be returned from the database? My table can hold very large number of rows (100000+) so performance is an issue here.

In this case, using the first() approach, the query will be executed immediately and it will optimized in such a way that it will ony retrieve 1 record. Most probably a top(1) select. You really need to check the genereated sql with a sql profilihg tool or by using the log of the datacontext. Or you can use linqpad. linq-2-sql can lead to N+1 queries if not used the proper way. This behaviour is quite predictable but in the beginning you really have to be aware.

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I am not sure how much LINQ2SQL and EF4 differ under the hood when it comes to resolving the LINQ queries, but my question refers to EF, and your answer to LINQ2SQL. –  Kornelije Petak Dec 15 '11 at 8:16
    
Sorry, my mistake. Still it will be pretty comparable. And if you use a profiler (either from SQL Server or if you use Express the Anj profiler) you can still see the result. I am confident that also in EF there will be an optimized select top(1) and not the entire set. –  Pleun Dec 15 '11 at 9:20

Try using:

var query = (from oData in db.OrderDatas
         where oData.Timestamp <= userTime
         orderby oData.Timestamp descending
         select oData).Take(1);

It's the equivalent of TOP 1

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