Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an array that has been serialized by php, the result is:

unserialize('a:2:{s:13:"custom_basket";a:1:{i:280583837398;a:4:{s:12:"product_name";s:0:"";s:8:"quantity";s:1:"1";s:5:"price";d:38.649999999999999;s:11:"description";a:7:{s:2:"id";s:12:"280583837398";s:3:"sku";s:0:"";s:4:"site";s:2:"UK";s:12:"condition_id";s:4:"1000";s:14:"transaction_id";s:12:"773563256018";s:8:"platform";s:4:"eBay";s:18:"order_line_item_id";s:25:"280583837398-773563256018";}}}s:6:"basket";a:0:{}}')

When I use my machine running php 5.3.5 I get:

Notice: unserialize() [function.unserialize]: Error at offset 46 of 405 bytes

When the dude next to me runs it on his machine running 5.3.6 he gets the array back out. Our server that runs php 5.3.4 also successfully unserializes the array.

The error that I get points to the first key in the second array i:280583837398 if I change this too s:12:"280583837398" my machine can now unserialize the array successfully.

Does anyone have any idea why this is happening. I have no idea if it is the php version, I just noticed that I had a different version to the two successful machines so thought it worth mentioning.

I am running MAMP PRO on Snow Leopard if that helps.

share|improve this question
    
Not sure if it's the version or not, but maybe the different versions handle ints differently. It seems like you understand s means a string of x length, hence s:12 is a string of length 12. But if php is trying to parse that as a 32 bit int, then it may fail. Also, is your machine 32-bit or 64-bit? –  Matt Dec 15 '11 at 8:33
    
Hi Matt, my machine is 64-bit. Its an Intel Core i5 Imac. –  Luke Dec 15 '11 at 8:44
    
I did not realise that my machine might fail on an integer that big, just editing the int down to 9 characters makes the unserialize succeed. Is this a common issue and is there a workaround? –  Luke Dec 15 '11 at 9:06
    
Also, how can my machine serialize the array in the first place but not unserialize it, are the ints handled differently in the two processes? –  Luke Dec 15 '11 at 9:15
    
I really don't know how php handles it. You can try to upgrade and see if it works, but thats kind of a weird issue. I guess you can always convert the int to a string before you serialize. –  Matt Dec 15 '11 at 9:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure if it's the version or not, but maybe the different versions handle ints differently. It seems like you understand s means a string of x length, hence s:12 is a string of length 12. But if php is trying to parse that as a 32 bit int, then it may fail.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for helping, we ended up adding "e" to the front so that serialize makes it a string instead –  Luke Dec 15 '11 at 10:47

280583837398 is a pretty big number, maybe your machine tries to fit it in an integer which supports numbers up to 32 bits.

You probably need long to store this one.

Thats all I can tell from this for now.

share|improve this answer
1  
PHP doesn't have longs, but it has 32 and 64 bit ints, depending on the architecture. –  deceze Dec 15 '11 at 8:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.