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Perhaps an odd question but here it goes: I have a function which I call periodically and within that function I need to know which iteration I'm in, or how many times the function has been called. A simplified version of the problem:

jQuery( document ).ready( function(){
    setInterval( "myFunction()", 3000 );
});

function myFunction()
{
    alert( "I have been called X times" );
}

So, how do I figure out the X in the above code?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could simply use a global variable, which is increased each time you call the function:

var myFuncCalls = 0;

function myFunction()
{
    myFuncCalls++;
    alert( "I have been called " + myFuncCalls + " times" );
}

As soon as your code gets a little more complex (or if you use a lot of other libraries), you should, however, consider using scoping as shown in the other answers here (best explained in the one by Vilx).

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Will this work even if the function is inside a separate file? Will that function have "knowledge" of the myFunCalls variable? –  Weblurk Dec 15 '11 at 9:13
    
In that case it's probably best if you also declare the variable in the separate file, it will be visible in your "main" document. I'm not 100% sure about the other way round –  RandolphCarter Dec 15 '11 at 9:14
    
Awesome, worked like a charm. Thanks! –  Weblurk Dec 15 '11 at 9:20
    
Yes, all the javascript files are sort of "copy-pasted" in the main document before they're executed. So they all share the same global variables and everything. That's why you should always be careful about making global variables - if two scripts make the same global variable, they'll bother each others work. –  Vilx- Dec 15 '11 at 9:22
    
True. Not a problem in this case though. –  Weblurk Dec 15 '11 at 9:27

Easy version: make a global variable like in nyarlathotep's answer. The problem - if some other code also defines a global variable with the same name, you're both in trouble.

Easy extended version - give the variable a crazy name that nobody will ever use: calledTimesED7E69A7B141457CA8908A612E3D7A3A

Clever version: append that variable to an existing global variable. Remember - everything's an object in Javascript!

$(function(){ setInterval(myFunction, 3000); });

function myFunction()
{
    myFunction.calledTimes++;
    alert( "I have been called " + myFunction.calledTimes + " times" );
}
myFunction.calledTimes = 0;

Traditional version: use scoping to hide that variable.

$(function()
{
    calledTimes = 0;
    setInterval(function()
    {
        calledTimes++;
        alert( "I have been called " + calledTimes + " times" );
    }, 3000); 
});

This hides "myFunction" though, so let's try again with a tricky kind of scoping:

var myFunction = null;
(function()
{
    calledTimes = 0;
    myFunction = function()
    {
        calledTimes++;
        alert( "I have been called " + calledTimes + " times" );
    } 
})();

$(function () { setInterval(myFunction, 3000); });

... and there are a zillion other ways you would hide that variable with scoping. Just pick your favorite.

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It still amazes me how much time and effort people put into answering questions here. If I could vote this answer up a thousand times I would :) Thanks for the extensive yet simply explained answers! –  Weblurk Dec 15 '11 at 9:24
2  
Naah, I'm just reluctant to get back to work! XD –  Vilx- Dec 15 '11 at 9:26

Don' use setInterval with 'myFunction()' (as a string), also there is no need for global counters.

$(function () {
  setInterval(myFunction, 3000);
});

function myFunction() {
  this.num = (this.num || 0) + 1;
  console.log(this.num);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/6baru/

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What's wrong with using a string in setInterval (see e.g. here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5801543/javascript-setinterval). The only disadvantage seems to be that it's a little less efficient, right? –  RandolphCarter Dec 15 '11 at 9:19
    
And a bit more difficult to read, and a bit longer to write. But, yeah, both ways are fine, really. –  Vilx- Dec 15 '11 at 9:32
3  
@nyarlathotep The problem with strings for setInterval is that local scopes won't work, have a look: jsfiddle.net/sTSvt (it produces an error as foo cannot be found). This means, you'll run into a lot of problems when writing modular code which tries not to pollute the global namespace. –  Yoshi Dec 15 '11 at 9:54

Here's another interesting solution that doesn't use an external variable. The best part about this is you can leave any pre-existing functions untouched and call them as you would normally. That means if you're attempting to "tap in" to an function in an existing library, this will work very well for you. It adds an unobtrusive counter and allows you to continue calling existing functions normally; even with arguments!

// no js library required

// pre-existing function
var a = function(){
    console.log("pre-existing function function");
    console.log("arguments:", arguments);
};

// add counter func
var addFnCounter = function(target){
    var swap = target;
    var count = 0;
    return function(){
        swap.apply(null, arguments);
        count++;
        console.log("func has been called " + count + " times");
        console.log("\n");
    };
};

// usage
a = addFnCounter(a);

// call a() as you would normally
a();
a(1,2,3);
a('hello', 'world');

// using your setInterval example
setInterval(a, 3000);

Output

pre-existing function function
arguments: []
func has been called 1 times

pre-existing function function
arguments: [1, 2, 3]
func has been called 2 times

pre-existing function function
arguments: ["hello", "world"]
func has been called 3 times

setInterval output

pre-existing function function
arguments: []
func has been called 4 times

pre-existing function function
arguments: []
func has been called 5 times

pre-existing function function
arguments: []
func has been called 6 times

See it working here on jsfiddle

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Create a global variable and initialize by zero. then increment by one when myfunction() called. Display that variable instead of X.

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You'll have to use a closure. Normally you would use a static variable. in Javascript it would look something like:

jQuery( document ).ready( function(){
    setInterval( "myFunction()", 3000 );
});

myFunction = (function(){
    var count = 0;
    return function(){
         count++
         alert( "I have been called " + count + " times");
    }
})();

Demonstration: http://jsfiddle.net/MZQ83/2/

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I don't think that works like you think it does... –  Vilx- Dec 15 '11 at 9:17
1  
precisely what mistake am I making? –  Ben West Dec 15 '11 at 9:19
1  
@Vilx- I don't think you understand how you think you do. –  maček Dec 16 '11 at 8:10
    
Ahh, none. I guess I should learn to read first. :P –  Vilx- Dec 16 '11 at 8:39

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