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I've a QMap object and I am trying to write its content to a file.

QMap<QString, QString> extentions;
//.. 

for(auto e : extensions)
{
  fout << e.first << "," << e.second << '\n';
}  

Why do I get: error: 'class QString' has no member named 'first' nor 'second'

Is e not of type QPair?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

If you want the STL style with first and second, do this:

for(auto e : extensions.toStdMap())
{
  fout << e.first << "," << e.second << '\n';
}

If you want to use what Qt offers, do this:

for(auto e : extensions.keys())
{
  fout << e << "," << extensions.value(e) << '\n';
}
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QMap::iterator uses key() and value() - which can be found easily in the documentation for Qt 4.8 or the documentation for Qt-5.

Edit:

A range-based for loop generates codes similar to this (see CPP reference):

{
    for (auto __begin = extensions.begin(), __end = extensions.end();
            __begin != __end; ++__begin) {
        auto e = *__begin; // <--- this is QMap::iterator::iterator*()
        fout << e.first << "," << e.second << '\n';
    }
} 

QMap::iterator::iterator*() is equivalent to QMap::iterator::value(), and does not give a pair.

The best way to write this is without range-based for loop:

auto end = extensions.cend();
for (auto it = extensions.cbegin(); it != end; ++it)
{
    std::cout << qPrintable(it.key()) << "," << qPrintable(it.value());
}
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#hmuelner key and value will trigger the same error –  user336635 Dec 15 '11 at 10:51
    
Edit: corrected the code and tested it –  hmuelner Mar 20 at 10:37

In "old" C++, using Qt, you would do it like this:

QMap< QString, whatever > extensions;
//...
foreach( QString key, extensions.keys() )
{
    fout << key << "," << extensions.value( key ) << '\n';
}

I don't have a C++11 compiler here but maybe the following will work:

for( auto key: extensions.keys() )
{
    fout << key << "," << extensions.value( key ) << '\n';
}

You can also use iterators instead, check out hmuelners link if you prefer using them

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1  
Thank you for the reference to doing this in "old" C++. Some of us are stuck in the kennel with the old dawgs ;-) –  Freedom_Ben Apr 9 '13 at 21:18
    
I doubt this is the most efficient "old" way of doing it. More likely: for(QMap<QString, whatever>::iterator it = map.begin(); it != map.end(); it++) {... } –  weberc2 Jun 16 at 20:30
    
Your way is probably slightly more efficient, though mine is both easier to write and easier to read. Also, in larger programs, optimizing file, UI and database operations is usually a lot more efficient than optimizing for loops.. –  Tim Meyer Jun 17 at 6:22

C++11 range-based-for uses the type of the dereferenced iterator as the automatically deduced "cursor" type. Here, it is the type of the expression *map.begin().
And since QMap::iterator::operator*() returns a reference to the value (of type QString &), the key isn't accessible using that method.

You should use one of the iterator methods described in the documentation but you should avoid using

  • keys() because it involves creating a list of keys and then searching the value for each key, or,
  • toStdMap() because it copies all the map elements to another one,

and that wouldn't be very optimal.


You could also use a wrapper to get QMap::iterator as the auto type:

template<class Map>
struct RangeWrapper {
    typedef typename Map::iterator MapIterator;
    Map &map;

    RangeWrapper(Map & map_) : map(map_) {}

    struct iterator {
        MapIterator mapIterator;
        iterator(const MapIterator &mapIterator_): mapIterator(mapIterator_) {}
        MapIterator operator*() {
            return mapIterator;
        }
        iterator & operator++() {
            ++mapIterator;
            return *this;
        }
        bool operator!=(const iterator & other) {
            return this->mapIterator != other.mapIterator;
        }
    };
    iterator begin() {
        return map.begin();
    }
    iterator end() {
        return map.end();
    }
};

// Function to be able to use automatic template type deduction
template<class Map>
RangeWrapper<Map> toRange(Map & map)
{
    return RangeWrapper<Map>(map);
}

// Usage code
QMap<QString, QString> extensions;
...
for(auto e : toRange(extensions)) {
    fout << e.key() << "," << e.value() << '\n';
}

There is another wrapper here.

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