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I have a file that looks like this:

192.168.2.2 150.25.45.7 8080
192.168.12.25 178.25.45.7 50
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 369
192.168.489.2 122.25.35.7 8080
192.168.489.2 90.254.45.7 80
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 457

I made up all the numbers.

I need to sort all these files according to the number of repetitions of the first ip. So the output would ideally look like this:

192.168.2.2 8080 369 457 3
192.168.489.2 8080 80 2
192.168.12.25 50 1

So: first ip, all the ports that were in lines with that first ip, and the number of repetitions.

I've been trying to play with the sort command and awk but I don't want to do extra work and maybe be missing out on some other straightforward solution.

Any idea? Thanks :)

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2  
What have you tried? –  Mansuro Dec 15 '11 at 10:30
    
It's called frequency or histogram –  sehe Dec 15 '11 at 10:33
    
I added a line on that. I'm just wondering if I'm missing on some straightforward solution. –  coconut Dec 15 '11 at 10:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A Perlish answer would look something like this.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my %data;

# Store IP address and port number
while (<DATA>) {
  chomp;
  my ($ip, undef, $port) = split;
  push @{$data{$ip}}, $port;
}

# Sort (in reverse) by length of list of ports
for (sort { @{$data{$b}} <=> @{$data{$a}} } keys %data) {
  say "$_ @{$data{$_}} ", scalar @{$data{$_}};
}

__DATA__
192.168.2.2 150.25.45.7 8080
192.168.12.25 178.25.45.7 50
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 369
192.168.489.2 122.25.35.7 8080
192.168.489.2 90.254.45.7 80
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 457

Output:

192.168.2.2 8080 369 457 3
192.168.489.2 8080 80 2
192.168.12.25 50 1
share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm! Can you explain what the <=> part does? I'm curious. Thanks! –  coconut Jan 28 '12 at 18:27
    
Read the documentation for sort (perldoc.perl.org/functions/sort.html) and the section in perlop on equality operators (perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Equality-Operators). –  Dave Cross Feb 1 '12 at 16:28

A Perl way:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my %repeat;
while(<DATA>) {
    if (/^(\d+(?:.\d+){3})\s\S+\s(\d+)$/) {
        push @{$repeat{$1}}, $2;
    }
}
foreach (sort {@{$repeat{$b}}<=>@{$repeat{$a}}} keys %repeat) {
    my $num = @{$repeat{$_}};
    print "$_ @{$repeat{$_}} $num\n";
}

__DATA__
192.168.2.2 150.25.45.7 8080
192.168.12.25 178.25.45.7 50
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 369
192.168.489.2 122.25.35.7 8080
192.168.489.2 90.254.45.7 80
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 457

output:

192.168.2.2 8080 369 457 3
192.168.489.2 8080 80 2
192.168.12.25 50 1
share|improve this answer
    
I think you missed the requirement to sort the output by the number of occurrences of each source IP address. –  Dave Cross Dec 15 '11 at 10:53
1  
@davorg: Yes I did. Updated answer. –  M42 Dec 15 '11 at 11:04

Another Perl solution:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %ips;
push @{$ips{$_->[0]}}, $_->[1]+0 for map{[split/ \S+ /]}<DATA>;

for (sort {@{$ips{$b}} <=> @{$ips{$a}}} keys %ips) {
    printf("%s %s %d\n", $_, join(" ", @{$ips{$_}}), 0+@{$ips{$_}});
}

__DATA__
192.168.2.2 150.25.45.7 8080
192.168.12.25 178.25.45.7 50
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 369
192.168.489.2 122.25.35.7 8080
192.168.489.2 90.254.45.7 80
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 457

Output:

192.168.2.2 8080 369 457 3
192.168.489.2 8080 80 2
192.168.12.25 50 1
share|improve this answer

this line should do the job for you:

awk '{a[$1]++;b[$1]=b[$1]" "$3}END{for(x in a)print a[x]"\t"x,b[x],a[x]}' input |
sort -nr|cut -f2-

test with your example

kent$  cat tt
192.168.2.2 150.25.45.7 8080
192.168.12.25 178.25.45.7 50
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 369
192.168.489.2 122.25.35.7 8080
192.168.489.2 90.254.45.7 80
192.168.2.2 142.55.45.18 457

kent$  awk '{a[$1]++;b[$1]=b[$1]" "$3}END{for(x in a)print a[x]"\t"x,b[x],a[x]}' tt |
sort -nr|cut -f2-
192.168.2.2  8080 369 457 3
192.168.489.2  8080 80 2
192.168.12.25  50 1
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Here's a pipeline relying mainly on awk and sort:

sort -k1 -k3n \
| awk -F' ' '
    NR==1 { 
      printf("%s ", $1); 
      current = $1 
    } 
    $1 != current { 
      printf(":%d\n%s ", count, $1); 
      current = $1; 
      count = 0 
    } 
    { printf("%d ", $3); count++ } 
    END { printf(":%d\n", count) }' \
| sort -t':' -k2nr \
| tr -d':'
share|improve this answer

GNU awk 4:

awk 'END {
  PROCINFO["sorted_in"] = "@val_num_desc"
  for (e in ic)
    print e, ip[e], ic[e] 
  }
{
  ip[$1] = $1 in ip ? ip[$1] OFS $NF : $NF
  ic[$1]++
  }' infile
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