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ls /home/user/new/*.txt prints all txt files in that directory. However it prints the output as follows:

[me@comp]$ ls /home/user/new/*.txt
/home/user/new/file1.txt    /home/user/new/file2.txt    /home/user/new/file3.txt

and so on.

I want to run the ls command not from the /home/user/new/ directory thus I have to give the full directory name, yet I want the output to be only as

[me@comp]$ ls /home/user/new/*.txt
file1.txt    file2.txt    file3.txt 

I don't want the entire path. Only filename is needed. This issues has to be solved using ls command, as its output is meant for another program.

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What OS? For example OS X does what you want already. Are you sure ls isn't aliased? –  Sean Owen Dec 15 '11 at 10:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

ls whateveryouwant | xargs -n 1 basename

Does that work for you?

Otherwise you can (cd /the/directory && ls) (yes, parentheses intended)

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Yes, it worked. Thankyou very much. –  Ashish Dec 15 '11 at 11:48

There are several ways you can achieve this. One would be something like:

for filepath in /path/to/dir/*
do
    filename=$(basename $file)

    ... whatever you want to do with the file here
done
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A fancy way to solve it is by using twice "rev" and "cut":

find ./ -name "*.txt" | rev | cut -d '/' -f1 | rev
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you could add an sed script to your commandline:

ls /home/user/new/*.txt | sed -r 's/^.+\///'
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I prefer the base name which is already answered by fge. Another way is :

ls /home/user/new/*.txt|awk -F"/" '{print $NF}'

one more ugly way is :

ls /home/user/new/*.txt| perl -pe 's/\//\n/g'|tail -1
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