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I was wondering if it was possible to determine what the current namespace was when the function was being called. I have this function declaration:

<?php
namespace Site\Action;
function add ($hook, $function) {
    /**
     * determine the namespace this was called from because
     * __NAMESPACE__ is "site\action" :(
     */
     if (is_callable($function))
         call_user_func($function);
}
?>

And on another file:

<?php
namespace Foo;
function bar () {
}
?>

And let's say I have this as my procedural code:

<?php
namespace Foo;
Site\Action\add('hookname', 'bar');
?>

It would make sense to assume that Bar in this case was intended to resolve as Foo\bar since that was the namespace it was called from.

That was a long explanation so again, is it possible to determine the active namespace where Site\Action\add() was called from?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You could pass __NAMESPACE__ as an argument. You might also be able to get the caller's namespace by looking at the call stack from debug_backtrace, but I'd REALLY not recommend doing that. –  GordonM Dec 15 '11 at 10:54
    
Actually I doubt that debug_backtrace does this, or im probably missing something. I guess I might just have to pass __NAMESPACE__ or just rethink the whole architecture. –  voldomazta Dec 15 '11 at 11:01
    
@GordonM What is your motivation for suggesting we not use debug_backtrace() I cant find any alarm bells, if you know of any problems of concern then now is not the time to hold it to yourself. Please elaborate... –  nickl- Sep 19 '12 at 21:37
    
@nickl- debug_backtrace is meant for debugging (the clue is in the name). It will generate a lot of data you don't need and as it's meant for debugging it probably isn't that optimized. Also, I suspect there's something wrong with your design if your functions need to know what's calling them All they should care about is the arguments passed to them. If you really need to know then just passing the function name as an argument is a lot easier. $foo = someFunction ($arg1, $arg2, __NAMESPACE__) –  GordonM Sep 20 '12 at 7:48
    
@GordonM Call it by any other name it traces the stack. For your argument we should all avoid print_r but at least its not called debug_print =) There are many options to limit the data generated DEBUG_BACKTRACE_IGNORE_ARGS and 5.4 also introduces $limit. Since you can pass the fully qualified name it makes your solution redundant. The question was not what is wrong with my design, unless you have a better way to solve the problem you will have to admit that the solution provided does as advertised, no matter what the use case requirement. I thought the purpose of SO was answers to questions? –  nickl- Sep 25 '12 at 0:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you are looking for is : ReflectionFunctionAbstract::getNamespaceName

If you want to know where you're coming from debug_backtrace() is your friend.

The following should solve your puzzle:

function backtrace_namespace() 
{
    $trace = array();
    $functions = array_map(
        function ($v) {
            return $v['function'];
        },
        debug_backtrace()
    );
    foreach ($functions as $func) {
        $f = new ReflectionFunction($func);
        $trace[] = array(
            'function' => $func, 
            'namespace' =>  $f->getNamespaceName()
        );
    }
    return $trace;
}

Just call it from anywhere to see the backtrace. I modified your "procedural" code file as follows:

namespace Foo;

function bar () 
{
    var_export(backtrace_namespace());
}

/** The unasked question: We need to use the fully qualified name currently. */
function go() 
{
    \Site\Action\add('hookname', 'Foo\\bar');
}

go();

The Result from including this file will be the following on stdout:

array (
    0 =>
    array (
        'function' => 'backtrace_namespace',
        'namespace' => '',
    ),
    1 =>
    array (
        'function' => 'Foo\\bar',
        'namespace' => 'Foo',
    ),
    2 =>
    array (
        'function' => 'call_user_func',
        'namespace' => '',
    ),
    3 =>
    array (
        'function' => 'Site\\Action\\add',
        'namespace' => 'Site\\Action',
    ),
    4 =>
    array (
        'function' => 'Foo\\go',
        'namespace' => 'Foo',
    ),
)

Now for bonus points the answer to the hidden question:

How do I resolve the calling namespace to avoid using fully qualified function name as argument?

The following will allow you to call the function as you intended:

 Site\Action\add('hookname', 'bar');

Without getting the dreaded:

Warning: call_user_func() expects parameter 1 to be a valid callback, function 'bar' not found or invalid function name

So before you redesign try this on for size:

namespace Site\Action;

function add($hook, $function) 
{
    $trace = backtrace_namespace();
    $prev = (object) end($trace);

    $function = "$prev->namespace\\$function";

    if (is_callable($function))
        call_user_func($function);
}

I see no reason why debug_backtrace should not be used, this is what it is there for.

nJoy!

share|improve this answer
    
You can also use the fully qualified function name from debug back_trace directly. Something like: $trace = debug_backtrace(); $trace = (object) end($trace); call_user_func(substr($trace->function, 0, strrpos($trace->function, '\\')+1).$function); that should work. /me crossing fingers... –  nickl- Sep 19 '12 at 21:45

i don't know if i'm missing something, but with this:

http://php.net/manual/en/reflectionclass.getnamespacename.php, i think that you can get namespace of the object you are using.

share|improve this answer
    
Close, you want to use ReflectionFunction instead of ReflectionClass. Note: we also have ReflectionMethod, ReflectionParameter, ReflectionProperty, ReflectionObject all very similar in usage. –  nickl- Sep 19 '12 at 21:57

If you were using closures instead of static functions you can always ask the reflection API

namespace A;
$closure = function($word = 'hello')
{
    return $word;
};

...

$r = new ReflectionFunction($closure);
print $r->getNamespaceName();
share|improve this answer
    
Works with any resolvable or valid callback function name. –  nickl- Sep 19 '12 at 21:33

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