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I have built in IDE x86 debbuger which disassemble this:

First case:

65 48 8B 05 30 00 00 00       

mov rax,gs:[rel $00000030]

Second case:

65 48 8B 04 25 30 00 00 00    

mov rax,gs:[+$0030]

...

What is the difference?

I suspect that something is wrong with disassembling but can't translate upper opcodes.

What I know is:

65 is gs prefix
48 is REX.W prefix
8B is mov ...
...???

Any help is greatly appreciated... :)

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what ide is that –  sehe Dec 15 '11 at 10:57
    
@sehe: Delphi XE2 IDE –  GJ. Dec 15 '11 at 11:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first one is RIP relative, while the second one is and absolute address.

For a translation of the opcodes, see http://www.sandpile.org . As Polynomial noted, http://ref.x86asm.net is even better but does currently not have support for AVX or XOP.

  • 8B - opcode - is given as mov Gv, Ev, where Gv indicates a register target, where Ev is a r/m destination.
  • 05 - mod r/m - indicate rax as target, with rip relative as effective address
  • 30 00 00 00 the offset to rip

The second one:

  • 8B - opcode - is given as mov Gv, Ev, where Gv indicates a register target, where Ev is a r/m destination.
  • 04 - mod r/m - indicate rax as target, with sib as effective address
  • 25 - sib - address is in format [basereg + indexreg*stride + offset], in this case both base and index are 0.
  • 30 00 00 00 the offset.
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3  
Sandpile is great. I'd also recommend ref.x86asm.net –  Polynomial Dec 15 '11 at 11:21
    
Thank you - this was the site I was looking for! I swear it was somewhere in my bookmarks, but I must have accidently deleted it. –  hirschhornsalz Dec 15 '11 at 11:27
    
So, if I understand than in first case the address is relative (rip + 0x30) and in the second case the address is absolute. –  GJ. Dec 15 '11 at 11:37
    
Short answer: Yes. –  hirschhornsalz Dec 15 '11 at 12:00

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