Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What does String* mean in C#?

I've seen this used in code examples but I can't derive from the context, and you can't search on this, due to the * being accepted as a wildcard in every search engine ever.


EDIT: Looks like it wasn't C#, which explains it. The specific code sample I'm looking at is extremely short (5 words) and I assumed it was mean to be C# from the context.

I was sure I'd seen it before, but my hazy memories were probably from other languages too.

share|improve this question
1  
Can you post a link to an example?? –  Christian Payne May 12 '09 at 9:58
    
disciplined approach would be to delete this question yourself. –  Cherian May 12 '09 at 10:06
1  
@Cherian: I don't think it's possible to delete a question with an upvoted answer. –  Mehrdad Afshari May 12 '09 at 10:07
    
@Cherian, you can't delete a question with an upvoted answer. Moreover, the answerer deserves the rep for their help, and if the question remains, someone might find it useful in the future. –  Colin Pickard May 12 '09 at 10:11
    
missed the upvoting rule. –  Cherian May 14 '09 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

String*? Are you sure it's C#? You can't have pointers to reference types in C#. Unless String is a defined struct or something in that specific code...

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. Only pointers to value types are possible in C#. –  Noldorin May 12 '09 at 9:59
    
And not all value types. There's a concept called unmanaged type which consists of primitive types and value types containing only primitive types. –  Mehrdad Afshari May 12 '09 at 10:00
    
That would explain it. The specific code sample I'm looking at is extremely short (5 words) and I assumed it was mean to be C# from the context, perhaps it's actually some other language, and the person that wrote it is actually getting confused (or trying to wind me up...). I'm sure I'd seen it before, but my hazy memories could actually be other languages too. –  Colin Pickard May 12 '09 at 10:02
    
Indeed String* is very common in old managed C++ (not C++/CLI, in which it's replaced by String^). –  Mehrdad Afshari May 12 '09 at 10:03
1  
Noldorin: I don't want to debate on this (btw, I think you used the term first ;) ). Just on the MSDN is always right part: I've seen wrong or misleading points on MSDN Library several times (and I hardly call MSDN magazine an authority relative to the MSDN library). For instance: stackoverflow.com/questions/833946/… –  Mehrdad Afshari May 12 '09 at 10:33

You sure you are not looking at Managed C++ examples?

share|improve this answer

You can use pointers in C# in unsafe code blocks, but I've only used them with value types or arrays of value types.

share|improve this answer
    
You can't have a pointer to a reference type in unsafe code. Not even a value type that hold a reference as a field. –  Mehrdad Afshari May 12 '09 at 10:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.