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I've got a generic type T. Using Marc's Operator class I can perform calculations on it.

Is it possible to detect by mere calculations whether the type is an integral or a nonintegral type?

Perhaps there is a better solution? I'd prefer to support any possible type, so I'd like to prevent hard-coding which types are integral/nonintegral.

Background info

The situation I find myself in is I want to cast a double to T but round to the nearest value of T to the double value.

int a = (int)2.6 results in 2 while I want it to result it in 3, without knowing the type (in this case int). It could also be double, in which case I want the outcome to be 2.6.

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@AakashM: int a = (int)2.6 results in 2 while I want it to result it in 3, without knowing the type (in this case int). It could also be double, in which case I want the outcome to be 2.6. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 14:05
3  
Do you perhaps mean 'integral' versus 'non-integral' ? –  AakashM Dec 15 '11 at 14:05
    
@AakashM: Memory is a bit rusty. I'm confusing IT terminology with math terminology and such, hopefully it is correct now. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 14:14
    
An integer is also a real number... –  Thomas Levesque Dec 15 '11 at 14:22
    
@StevenJeuris - No, a integer in C# HAS to be a real number, so what you want to figure out is not clear. –  Ramhound Dec 15 '11 at 14:24

4 Answers 4

Have you tried Convert.ChangeType? Something like:

Convert.ChangeType(1.9d, typeof (T))

It will work for all numeric types I think (as long as the first parameter is iConvertible and the type is a supported one which all basic numerics should be I believe).

Its important to mention that this will call something like double.ToInt32 which rounds values rather than truncates (bankers rounding I believe).

I tested this in a little LinqPad program and it does what I think you want:

void Main()
{
    var foo = RetNum<decimal>();
    foo.Dump();
}

public static T RetNum<T>()
{
    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(1.9d, typeof (T));
}
share|improve this answer
2  
And here I was halfway through writing a generic method to do exactly what ChangeType does. +1. –  Esoteric Screen Name Dec 15 '11 at 20:05
    
I don't know whether I should accept this or not. :) It doesn't answer the question, but yes, it is a solution to the situation which made me ask this question. However, I bet it is pretty damn slow (compared to conditionally calling Math.Round()) and this can be called very often. It also relies on IConvertible being implemented, which is less of an issue. I'd prefer to check one time whether a type is integral or not, and conditionally call Math.Round() based on that cached result. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 20:53
    
I would have thought the performance wasn't too bad to be honest. Mainly because it seems to do exactly what you want and I would assume that the .NET people have written it as efficiently as possible. Other ways I can see discussed in comments seem to be using more than just Math.Round() (eg I can see talk of Expression.Convert) so I'd be unsure of their performance as well. I'd suggest actually testing what I've suggested to see how it peforms. You may find that any alternative ends up with a lot of logic to deal with the edge cases, etc. –  Chris Dec 19 '11 at 9:55
    
Also as a note I've just checked how Convert.ChangeType works and it does basically loop over all the possible types defined in iConvertible and calls the ToX method on whichever is appropriate. This should be pretty speedy I'd have thought. –  Chris Dec 19 '11 at 10:31

Here's a method which will determine if a particular value stored in a generic numeric type is an integer without hardcoding. Tested working for me on .NET 4. Correctly handles all built in numeric types (as defined in the MSDN link at the bottom) except BigInteger, which doesn't implement IConvertible.

        public static bool? IsInteger<T>(T testNumber) where T : IConvertible
        {
            // returns null if T is non-numeric
            bool? isInt = null;
            try
            {
                isInt = testNumber.ToUInt64(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) == testNumber.ToDouble(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
            }
            catch (OverflowException)
            {
                // casting a negative int will cause this exception
                try
                {
                    isInt = testNumber.ToInt64(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) == testNumber.ToDouble(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
                }
                catch
                {
                    // throw depending on desired behavior
                }
            }
            catch
            {
                // throw depending on desired behavior
            }
            return isInt;
        }

Here's a method which will determine whether a particular type is an integral type.

    public static bool? IsIntegerType<T>() where T : IConvertible
    {
        bool? isInt = null;
        try
        {
            isInt = Math.Round((double)Convert.ChangeType((T)Convert.ChangeType(0.1d, typeof(T)),typeof(double)), 1) != .1d;
            // if you don't round it and T is float you'll get the wrong result
        }
        catch
        {   
            // T is a non numeric type, or something went wrong with the activator
        }
        return isInt;
    }

Convert.ChangeType is the way to convert, with rounding, between two generic numeric types. But for kicks and curiosity, here's a way to convert a generic numeric type to an int, which could be extended to return a generic type without too much difficulty.

    public static int GetInt32<T>(T target) where T : IConvertible
    {
        bool? isInt = IsInteger<T>(target);
        if (isInt == null) throw new ArgumentException(); // put an appropriate message in
        else if (isInt == true)
        {
            try
            {
                int i = target.ToInt32(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
                return i;
            }
            catch
            {   // exceeded size of int32
                throw new OverflowException(); // put an appropriate message in
            }
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                double d = target.ToDouble(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
                return (int)Math.Round(d);
            }
            catch
            {   // exceeded size of int32
                throw new OverflowException(); // put an appropriate message in
            }
        }
    }

My results:

        double d = 1.9;
        byte b = 1;
        sbyte sb = 1;
        float f = 2.0f;
        short s = 1;
        int i = -3;
        UInt16 ui = 44;
        ulong ul = ulong.MaxValue;
        bool? dd = IsInteger<double>(d); // false
        bool? dt = IsInteger<DateTime>(DateTime.Now); // null
        bool? db = IsInteger<byte>(b); // true
        bool? dsb = IsInteger<sbyte>(sb); // true
        bool? df = IsInteger<float>(f); // true
        bool? ds = IsInteger<short>(s); // true
        bool? di = IsInteger<int>(i); // true
        bool? dui = IsInteger<UInt16>(ui); // true
        bool? dul = IsInteger<ulong>(ul); // true
        int converted = GetInt32<double>(d); // coverted==2
        bool? isd = IsIntegerType<double>(); // false
        bool? isi = IsIntegerType<int>(); // true

Additionally, this MSDN page has some example code which might be helpful. Specifically, it includes a list of types considered to be numeric.

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2  
Problem with this solution is you have to pass testNumber. I don't know the type, so I can't pass a sample value. I can however cast a double value to the unknown type, but at that point the decimal part can already be lost if its an integral type. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 21:12
    
Good point, I was only thinking in one direction. Also, my code detects whether the value is an integer, but you want to know whether the type is integral. Edit forthcoming. –  Esoteric Screen Name Dec 15 '11 at 21:32
    
Also figured of using Activator.CreateInstance at some point. But this will fail for custom types which don't have an empty constructor. :) P.s. Check out my answer. Haven't gotten to implementing it yet, but believe I might be onto something, it might interest you as well. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 22:29
    
Very true. The sticky point is that there doesn't seem to be a way to check whether a type is integral without at least one instance of that type. Going to investigate use of reflection to find appropriate constructors for custom types. The division in your answer is pretty slick! –  Esoteric Screen Name Dec 15 '11 at 23:12
    
Oh, totally skipped that 0.1d part. I don't see why you need the Activator :/. double -> T -> double could work! That only leaves the question whether for some custom types other than float due to precision issues it would be rounded differently? +1 for all your effort on this! –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 23:13

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking, but:

To check if it's an integral type, use this: if (obj is float || obj is double), or if typeof(T) == typeof(float) || typeof(T) == typeof(double))

To check if it's an integral value, cast it to a double, and then do if(value == Math.Round(value))

Of course, that is assuming that you have a number in the first place. I believe that the Operator class you're using supports things like DateTime. Would it be better to make your generic method have a generic constraint where T : IConvertible? That way there'd be explicit ToDouble and ToInteger methods.

Edit:

I think I understand: you've got two local variables, double d; T num;. You want to cast d to type T, but with proper rounding if T is a integral type. Is that correct?

Assuming that's correct, here's what I'd do:

public void SomeMethod<T>()
{
    double d;
    // I think I got all the floating-point types. There's only a few, so we can test for them explicitly.
    if(typeof(T) != typeof(double) && typeof(T) != typeof(float) && typeof(T) != typeof(Decimal))
    {
        d = Math.Round(d);
    }
    T converted = Convert.ChangeType(d, typeof(T));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Concerning IConvertible, not a bad idea at all. Am considering it now. Checking the type explicitly is what I wanted to avoid. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 15:15
    
... however, that doesn't solve my actual issue which is mentioned in the example. ;p I need to check whether it is nonintegral so that I now whether or not I have to round the value. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 15:20
    
So if the result is not a whole number, you want to round it to a whole number, is that it? –  David Yaw Dec 15 '11 at 16:44
    
No, I only want to round it to a whole number if the type I am converting too is an integral type, not when it is e.g. a double. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 15 '11 at 19:39
2  
Is this correct: You've got a double, and you want to convert it to a T, but with proper rounding if T is an integer type? See edit. –  David Yaw Dec 15 '11 at 20:13

Chris's answer gives a possible solution to the scenario I mentioned, but for performance reasons I am still attempting to answer the actual question.

The assumption (untested) is, Convert.ChangeType is much slower than Math.Round(). Ideally, I can check one time whether the given type is integral or not, and conditionally call Math.Round() from then on to obtain a much more efficient solution than calling Convert.ChangeType() constantly.

I'm attempting the following implementation:

  1. Convert both 3, 2 and 1 to the desired unknown type. (This assumes a conversion from an int to the numeric type is possible, which should always be possible anyhow.)
  2. In case 3 / 2 == 1, it is an integral type. Otherwise, it is a nonintegral type.

This solution doesn't rely anywhere on knowing the type and solely uses conversions and calculations.

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You can't assume implicit conversions with int for custom classes, and it's not defined for BigInteger. –  Esoteric Screen Name Dec 16 '11 at 1:07
    
@EsotericScreenName: My mistake. It doesn't have to be implicit. I'm thinking of using Expression.Convert which also allows explicit. As far as assuming it is convertible, that's a requirement I'm willing to rely on. It makes sense for a numeric type to be convertible to at least an integral type. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 16 '11 at 1:18
    
@EsotericScreenName I just realize, this has a similar "problem" as in your solution. Suppose you make a custom type suited for a very precise range between 0 and 1. Conversions to 2 and 3 won't be possible. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 16 '11 at 1:25
    
That's why I've been comparing against 0.1. Assuming the conversion to double exists, your high precision custom type would be properly tested by my code. However, mine would fail for custom types that don't have a conversion to double. The other problem this method has is that it requires the division operator to be defined. Generally, I don't think it's possible to compare against a custom type. I can't get a comparison against BigInteger to work. You can't cast to it from primitive numerics. You can use a constructor, but that's no good, since it introduces more restrictive requirements. –  Esoteric Screen Name Dec 16 '11 at 17:44
    
@EsotericScreenName: A type that doesn't define the division operator isn't a numeric type. For comparisons you can use IComparable, or just the comparison operators, which it should implement as well anyhow. Conversion to double is expected to be supported as well for a proper numeric type, but, what I meant with having a similar problem is that e.g. a fictional custom floating point with a precision of .5 won't work with your solution. But all that is pretty fictional. :) –  Steven Jeuris Dec 16 '11 at 18:51

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