Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Being a designer with limited coding experience, I always considered regex to be some kind of black magic. Recently, I've been reading up a bit - and I'm getting pretty intrigued by its possibilities. So I decided to give it a first try in my current php project.

I want to find all URLs of the following structure:

http://[any subdomain, only a-z].domain.com/[any subfolder, can contain a-z,A-Z,0-9,- and _]/

Examples:

My regex:

http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/

My questions:

  • The regex is working, but I'm just wondering whether it could be improved. For instance, I tried adding case insencitive with (i?) but couldn't get it working.
  • I could only get it working in php if I added double quotes at start and end of the expression, why is that? $ref = preg_replace('"http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/"','',$ref);
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In php regex must be delimited, usualy by / but it can be almost any character.

The reason why your second attempt works is because you're using " as delimiter.

To be case insensitive you have to put the flag i after the second delimiter:

$ref = preg_replace('"http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/"i','',$ref);
                                                           here ___^

With the i flag there're no needs for [a-zA-Z] and [a-z] would suffice. Moreover you don't need to escape the underscore _ in the character class and not the dash - if it's placed at the first or the last position within the character class

$ref = preg_replace('"http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[a-z0-9_-]*/"i','',$ref);

Note that [a-zA-Z0-9_] can be abbreviated as \w, then your code could look like:

$ref = preg_replace('"http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[\w-]*/"i','',$ref);

Take into account that * stands for 0 or more times, so your regex will match something like:

http://.domain.com//

Change * by + that means 1 or more time to be sure you have at least one char for the subdomain and one char for subfolder:

$ref = preg_replace('"http://[a-z]+\.domain\.com/[\w-]+/"i','',$ref);

And then " is unusual for delimiter, use for example #, ~ or !:

$ref = preg_replace('#http://[a-z]+\.domain\.com/[\w-]+/#i','',$ref);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i was wondering where to put the i flag. – ptriek Dec 15 '11 at 14:06
    
I tried to move the dash in the second character range to the beginning but lack privs. You mention this in the text but forgot to change it in your example. – sh-beta Dec 15 '11 at 14:07
    
@sh-beta: I put it as the last character of the class as I used to, but it also works fine if it's the first: [-a-z] is the same as [a-z-] – Toto Dec 15 '11 at 14:21
    
I'm marking this one as the correct answer, though Gnat and @sh-beta have been very helpfull too - thanks all! – ptriek Dec 15 '11 at 14:48
    
@M42 Hey, you're right. Funny how convention can sometimes become fact in your own head... – sh-beta Dec 15 '11 at 14:51

Answering your questions in reverse order.

I could only get it working in php if I added double quotes at start and end of the expression, why is that? $ref = preg_replace('"http://[a-z].domain.com/[A-Za-z0-9_-]/"','',$ref);

Your double-quotes are acting as the regex delimiter. Typically, forward slashes take this role and using them literally requires you to escape them like you did your dots. Almost any punctuation can act as your delimiter, so the following are all equivalent:

$pattern0 = '"http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/"';
$pattern1 = '!http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/!';
$pattern2 = '/http:\/\/[a-z]*\.domain\.com\/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*\//';

These are all perfectly valid, but convention is to use ! as your delimiter if / is unclear. I'm going to stick with $pattern1 in the next question..

The regex is working, but I'm just wondering whether it could be improved. For instance, I tried adding case insencitive with (i?) but couldn't get it working.

Add the i after your final regex delimiter for case insensitivity:

'!http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/!i'

Move the hyphen - to the beginning of your character range so you don't hav to escape it. Also, there's no need to escape the underscore:

'!http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[-A-Za-z0-9_]*/!i'

Next, use character classes to simplify your character ranges. In this case, \w matches [a-zA-Z0-9_].

'!http://[a-z]*\.domain\.com/[-\w]*/!i'

Finally, your use of * as a quantifier means that you might get some odd, ultimately invalid matches. All of these will match:

http://www.domain.com/foo/
http://.domain.com/foo/
http://.domain.com//

The last two are broken. If you're parsing known good URLs (such as from log files), that's not really a problem. if you need to be more strict, use the + quantifier to require at least one character in the subdomain and path:

'!http://[a-z]+\.domain\.com/[-\w]+/!i'

That's a bit more readable now.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, very interesting read - especially the \w - serious improvement indeed. – ptriek Dec 15 '11 at 14:12

If you have [a-z]*\. after HTTP, then this will match http://.domain.com/etc/, which is invalid. I'd suggest instead

http://([a-z]+\.)?domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/

This will match http://domain.com/etc/ and http://www.domain.com/etc/ but not http://.domain.com/etc/.

If you must have a subdomain, I'd suggest http://[a-z]+\.domain\.com/[A-Za-z0-9\_\-]*/, which forces a subdomain to be present.

Similar also with the final group. At the moment it will allow http://www.domain.com//. I'd suggest + instead of * to force the presence of a directory name, i.e. [A-Za-z0-9\_\-]+

share|improve this answer

A nice answer was provided by M42 earlier. I just want to make two additions:

  • I would use "https?" instead if https link were allowed also
  • I would add a ? after the last slash (as it could be missing and mean the same thing most of the time)

So the pattern would be something like:

$pattern = '/https?\:\/\/[a-z]+\.domain\.com\/[a-z0-9\_\-]*\/?/i';
share|improve this answer

The regex is working, but I'm just wondering whether it could be improved. For instance, I tried adding case insencitive with (i?) but couldn't get it working.

try using the i flag.

I could only get it working in php if I added double quotes at start and end of the expression, why is that?

it is because the " is delimiter in you regex.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.