Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm currently refactoring an application that already uses JPA but the JPA EnitytManager (and the transactions) are currently scoped to the DAO layer. There is also a repository layer and a service layer. I want to make the service layer transactional and have a single EntityManger per request on the service layer. Ideally I don't want either my service or repository layers to know anything about JPA.

Currently the repository and the service layers work with detached entities that they get from the DAO layer. Changes are made to the model and the entities are merged back into the DAO layer. In the new structure the entities remain managed during the entire request, and 1 request is contained within 1 transaction. Changes are automatically committed at the end of the transaction. This seems a lot more in the spirit of JPA and works quite well in the most common cases.

Sometimes though changes are made to the model and the model is then validated. If the model isn't valid anymore the changes shouldn't be saved. In the old structure this was straightforward:

In this example process is basically a graph and the entire graph has to validate, no self references, every node has to be reachable, the first node has some special requirements, there needs to be a final node, etc, etc. We first make the changes to the model and then validate the model.

Repository layer code old:

changeProcessModel();
messages = ProcessValidator.validate(process);
if (messages.hasNoErrors()) {
    processDao.merge(process);
    messages.addInfoMessage("Process was updated succesfully");
}
return messages;

In the new structure I think I have three options and I'm questioning which one is considered the best practice, or if there are any other alternatives.

New code option 1:

changeProcessModel();
messages = ProcessValidator.validate(process);
if (messages.hasNoErrors()) {
    messages.addInfoMessage("Process was updated succesfully");
} else {
    throw new InvalidProcessException(messages);
}
return messages;

This code sort of abuses a RuntimeException for the validation of some business rules. I don't think this is considered best practice, but the transaction is rolledback. This also seems compatible with for instance Bean Validation that also throws an exception if the entity doesn't validate.

New code option 2:

changeProcessModel();
messages = ProcessValidator.validate(process);
if (messages.hasNoErrors()) {
    messages.addInfoMessage("Process was updated succesfully");
} else {
    em.getTransactionManager.rollback();
}
return messages;

This code does a rollback directly on the JPA TransactionManager and introduces a dependency between my Repository layer and JPA.

New code option 3:

changeProcessModel();
messages = ProcessValidator.validate(process);
if (messages.hasNoErrors()) {
    messages.addInfoMessage("Process was updated succesfully");
} else {
    processDao.refresh(process);
}
return messages;

This code seems pretty nice, but it does depend on the CascadeType.REFRESH to be properly set on the process Entity relations that need to be refreshed.

I could also for example to a processDao.clear(); or processDao.rollback(); But that increases the scope of the processDao to the entire entityManger. I'm not sure if that is a very clean method either.

What are your thoughts on this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I think the lesser you know about your persistency in your domain the better. So in line with thoughts about seeing persistence as a service for the domain model instead of seeing it as a part of the model I would suggest the following solution:

  • The domain has to be in a consistent state, always;
  • So; changes coming into the model (being from a service, a UI of what have you) cannot alter the model without knowing the future model is validated.
  • Meaning: the current model is always consistent.

In a formula: Future model = CurrentModel.PerformChanges().Validated();

How can this be done? Probably using a unit of Work kind of construction. (http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/unitOfWork.html) Whenever a domainobject is changed and is validated it raises an event that it is altered. The unit Of Work manager is responsible for fetching those events and then making sure the stuff is put into the database. When the changes won't validate, the event is not raised and the model is marked "invalid". Because you work in an request isolated mode, this is not a problem. When you work in an shared domain model the changes have to be rolled back in your domain!

This probably is the most academic approach to the solution, but perhaps it helps getting the discussion started, what to do in these situations...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.