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having a DateTime variable, for example:

DateTime testDate = new DateTime(2011,12,15,00,00,00);

how can I implement a foreach loop for every hour of this day?

Something like:

foreach (int myHour in testDate.Date)
{

}

but in this way does not compile.

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7 Answers 7

It is not a good idea to loop 24, because this will not work on days with 25 or 23 hours (time change, daylight saving...).

Use the AddHour function and a target date.

DateTime testDate = new DateTime(2011, 12, 15, 00, 00, 00, DateTimeKind.Local);
DateTime endDate = testDate.AddDays(1);

while (testDate.Date != endDate.Date)
{
    Console.WriteLine(testDate.ToString());
    testDate = testDate.AddHours(1);
}

More Information

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1  
Careful of the side-effect of testDate having changed when you're finished with the loop. –  Ray Dec 15 '11 at 14:28
3  
+1, works even when a day has 23 or 25 hours due to DST –  Justin Dec 15 '11 at 14:29
    
@Justin does it? I'm quite curious. Because it would have to know the timezone to do that. –  Ray Dec 15 '11 at 14:32
    
@dknaack I tried it and no it doesn't. And AFAIK culture isn't related to TimeZone. –  Ray Dec 15 '11 at 14:46
1  
"this will not work on days with 25 or 23 hours" - this is nonsense. DateTime.AddHours doesn't take any account of daylight saving time. –  Joe Feb 14 '12 at 14:17

Use for instead:

DateTime date = new DateTime(2011,12,15);
for(int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
{
    DateTime time = date.AddHours(i);
    ...
}

If you really want to use foreach, you could create an extension method like this:

static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<DateTime> GetHours(this DateTime date)
    {
        date = date.Date; // truncate hours
        for(int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
        {
            yield return date.AddHours(i);
        }
    }
}

...

DateTime date = new DateTime(2011,12,15);
foreach (DateTime time in date.GetHours())
{
    ...
}
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@Stmated it's not modifying the original date. So at the start of each loop iteration date will always be the same. –  Ray Dec 15 '11 at 14:29
2  
Justin bought up a very good point in another answer. Not all days have 24hours!! –  Ray Dec 15 '11 at 14:30
1  
@Ray, that depends on what you mean by "day". Days as represented by System.DateTime have 24 hours, so .AddDays(x) and .AddHours(x * 24) will always have the same result (indeed, they both call the same .Add() method with multipliers a factor of 24 from each other). Therefore, the historical cases of time changes and cases of leap-seconds require something more sophisticated than direct use of DateTime anyway. –  Jon Hanna Dec 15 '11 at 14:41
1  
@JonHanna indeed. It requires a more sophisticated solution if that is the intent is for this to be correct for Daylight Savings. –  Ray Dec 15 '11 at 14:48

For those who don't like plain old for loops :) :

DateTime testDate = new DateTime(2011,12,15,00,00,00);
foreach (int hour in Enumerable.Range(0,24)) {
    DateTime dateWithHour = testDate.AddHours(hour);
}
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May as well LINQify it as well ... Enumerable.Range(0,24).ForEach(hour => testDate.AddHours(hour); ... ) –  StuartLC Dec 15 '11 at 14:32
2  
@nonnb IEnumerable<T> doesn't have a ForEach extension method. You'd have to ToList() first. –  vcsjones Dec 15 '11 at 14:35
    
Thank you very much Jan –  Ciupaz Dec 15 '11 at 15:04

foreach loop works in list but here testDate.Date never gives you hour. so in substitution of it use for loop or do while or while loop.

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The code below allows you to cycle through the hours of the day but also starting from a specific hour. It could be simpler if you do not need to support starting from an hour offset.

DateTime testDate = new DateTime(2011,12,15,13,00,00);
var hoursLeft = 24 - testDate.Hour;

for (var hour = 1; hour < hoursLeft; hour++)
{
    var nextDate = testDate.AddHours(hour);
    Console.WriteLine(nextDate);
}
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Iterate over all 24 hours of the day:

DateTime testDate = new DateTime(2011, 12, 15);

for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
{
    DateTime hour = testDate.Date.AddHours(i);
    // Your code here
}
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simply do this

DateTime testDate = new DateTime(2011, 12, 15, 10, 00, 00);
        for (int i = testDate.Hour; i < 24; i++)
        {
            //do what ever

        }
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