Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We're currently developing an application (C#, .Net 4.0) which requires the handling of various assets. In order to keep track of an asset's state, we developed an "AssetState" class, which returns the various states an asset can be in:

/// <summary>
/// Represents the states an asset can be in.
/// </summary>
public class AssetState
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="AssetState"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public AssetState()
    {
    }

    #region Properties

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a normal asset state.
    /// </summary>
    public static AssetState None
    {
        get
        {
            return new AssetState();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a dirty asset state.
    /// </summary>
    public static AssetState Dirty
    {
        get
        {
            return new AssetState();
        }
    }

    (etc...)

    #endregion Properties

    #region Methods

    /// <summary>
    /// Overloaded operator used to combine two states into a new one.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="leftOperandState">The left operand in the equation.</param>
    /// <param name="rightOperandState">The right operand in the equation.</param>
    /// <returns>A new asset state, which is the AND combination of both operands, in the form of a list of states.</returns>
    public static List<AssetState> operator &(AssetState leftOperandState, AssetState rightOperandState)
    {
        if (leftOperandState == None && rightOperandState != None)
        {
            return new List<AssetState> { rightOperandState };
        }

        if (leftOperandState != None && rightOperandState == None)
        {
            return new List<AssetState> { leftOperandState };
        }

        if (leftOperandState == None && rightOperandState == None)
        {
            return new List<AssetState> { leftOperandState };
        }

        return new List<AssetState> { leftOperandState, rightOperandState };
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Overloaded operator used to combine two states into a new one.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="leftOperandStates">The left operand in the equation.</param>
    /// <param name="rightOperandState">The right operand in the equation.</param>
    /// <returns>A new asset state, which is the AND combination of both operands, in the form of a list of states.</returns>
    public static List<AssetState> operator &(List<AssetState> leftOperandStates, AssetState rightOperandState)
    {
        var newAssetState = new List<AssetState>();   

        newAssetState.AddRange(leftOperandStates);
        newAssetState.Add(rightOperandState);

        return newAssetState;
    }

    #endregion Methods
}

An "Asset" class will contain a list of AssetStates. As such, an item could be flagged as "Dirty" and "CheckedOut", for example. When we need to determine an asset's state, we simply iterate through that list and determine if a particular state (or set of states) are present.

In the Asset Class:

    /// <summary>
    /// Method which determines if the asset is in a particular state.
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsInState(AssetState assetState)
    {
        return States.Contains(assetState);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Method which determines if the asset is in a particular combination of states.
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsInStates(IEnumerable<AssetState> assetStates)
    {
        if (assetStates == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("assetStates");
        }

        // Determine if this asset is in all the states requested.
        return assetStates.All(assetState => assetState != null && this.IsInState(assetState));
    }

Is there a better way to approach this problem ? Are there any major pitfalls in the system we developed, which we overlooked ? (while keeping in mind that the code here isn't final, but a rough draft).

share|improve this question
1  
Using a linked list should be ok if each object only has a few states, but if an object can have many states (perhaps dozens), then you would want some sort of hash-based or binary-tree-based solution. –  David Brigada Dec 15 '11 at 14:41
    
Is the list of states dynamic, or are there a known and fixed set of states that a given asset can have? –  Maess Dec 15 '11 at 14:43
    
Thanks for the input. We are estimating an asset to have about 4-5 states. The list of states is fixed and known, and would be hardcoded in the form of static properties within the AssetState class (at least, that was the initial plan). –  Hussein Khalil Dec 15 '11 at 14:46
1  
Why can't you just use an enum with the Flags attribute? –  Henrik Dec 15 '11 at 14:47
1  
@Henrik: Thanks, I'll take a look at the Flags attribute. First time I heard of it, we learn something new everyday :). Would you suggest simply replacing the static variables with an enum ? –  Hussein Khalil Dec 15 '11 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It looks like you would be better off using an enum with a Flags attribute. Take a look here.

With the Flags attribute you will be able to use & and | operators. Here is an example:

// make a dirty & checked-out state
AssetState state = AssetState.Dirty | AssetState.CheckedOut;

// check if state contains Dirty
if ((state & AssetState.Dirty) != 0)
{
    // handle the dirty state
}

Be careful what values you assign to your enum. They should be 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. otherwise you won't be able to combine them properly using logical operators.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent comment, thank you. Good call also on the enum values ! –  Hussein Khalil Dec 15 '11 at 15:03

For such a small number of possible states to combine, use an enum rather than a class.

[Flags]
enum AssetState
{
    None = 0,
    Dirty = 1,
    CheckedOut = 2,
    RequiresAudit = 4
}
//Create new state for checked out and requires audit
AssetState state = AssetState.CheckedOut | AssetState.RequiresAudit;
//Set dirty without changing rest of state:
state |= AssetState.Dirty;
//Check if is "dirty":
bool isDirty = (state & AssetState.Dirty) != AssetState.None;
//Check if is "dirty" alternative method:
bool isDirty = state.HasFlag(AssetState.Dirty);

You could also add values for common combinations to the enum definition, such as CheckedOutAndDity = 3

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, your answer and Daniel's are spot on. Is there really no way to accept two answers ? :) –  Hussein Khalil Dec 15 '11 at 15:03
    
Well, at least you can vote both up. I think the tradition is that if the two answers are truly of equal value to your mind, you should accept the earliest with a bit of consideration to the fact if someone went into more detail it would have taken longer to type. Daniel's is about the same length as mine, and was a bit earlier, so he should get the tick. Besides, he's a newer member so hasn't had the chance to earn as many points and badges as me. –  Jon Hanna Dec 15 '11 at 15:12
    
Good call, thanks for the insight, I'm learning as well :) –  Hussein Khalil Dec 15 '11 at 15:13
    
Thanks Hussein and Jon. –  Daniel Gabriel Dec 15 '11 at 15:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.