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I have a System.Array of value struct types, something like this:

public value struct Position
{
    int timestamp;
    float x;
    float y;
}

Position[] positions = new Position[1000 * 1000];

After I initialize the array with values, how can I get a byte[] of it's content, without serializing one item at a time?

In C++/CLI I would use a pin_ptr to get the pointer to the array content and I would copy the data from there. Can I do something like this in C#?

EDIT: I need to write the raw data to disk, as if it were a C struct, without any kind of serialization.

I tagged this question as C# for broader exposure, but actually I'm trying to serialize the data from IronPython, so this means I can't use any unsafe C# functionality.

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1  
Doesn't the Convert.GetBytes() work? –  Default Dec 15 '11 at 16:28
    
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1068541/… –  Kugel Dec 15 '11 at 16:29
    
@Default: if you are referring to BitConverter.GetBytes, no, it doesn't work. It returns a byte[] with a single byte inside –  Adal Dec 15 '11 at 16:34
1  
What are you trying to do with the resultant byte array? Do you need to store it in a DB, send to a web service, or ??? Knowing this might help us come up with the appropriate solution. –  competent_tech Dec 15 '11 at 16:50
    
@competent_tech: I've updated the description –  Adal Dec 15 '11 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a method that doesn't require unsafe code:

[Updated to remove the for loop and perform the copy in a single pass]

private static byte[] StructureToByteArray(Position[] posArray)
{
    if (posArray == null || posArray.Length == 0)
    {
        return new byte[0];
    }

    var lenOfObject = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(Position));
    var len = lenOfObject * posArray.Length;
    var arr = new byte[len];

    var handle = GCHandle.Alloc(posArray, GCHandleType.Pinned);
    try
    {
        var ptr = handle.AddrOfPinnedObject();
        Marshal.Copy(ptr, arr, 0, len);
    }
    finally
    {
        handle.Free();
    }

    return arr;
}
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Same question as on the unsafe answer: Would it be a good idea to apply the StructLayout attribute with a LayoutKind of either Sequential or Explicit to the Position struct if using this approach, or does it not matter? –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Dec 15 '11 at 17:15
    
It would be a good idea to specify LayoutKind.Sequential. Since structs are so often used for interop, it's the default for the C#/VB.NET compilers (and probably others), but there's no guarantee that will remain true. –  Andy Wilson Dec 15 '11 at 17:42
    
This goes through each item. I want to avoid that. –  Adal Dec 15 '11 at 20:39
    
I updated my answer to remove the loop. –  Andy Wilson Dec 15 '11 at 21:55

Maybe this will help:

[Serializable()]
    public struct Position
    {
        int timestamp;
        float x;
        float y;
    }


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var positions = new Position[1000 * 1000];
        GetBytes(positions);
    }
    private static byte[] GetBytes(object obj)
    {
        using (var memoryStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream())
        {
            var binaryFormatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
            binaryFormatter.Serialize(memoryStream, obj);
            return memoryStream.ToArray();
        }
    }
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I don't think that the Serialization formatters return the raw data. –  Adal Dec 15 '11 at 16:46
    
This approach does give a byte array, and it requires very little coding effort, so I think this is perfectly valid answer. Granted, the resulting byte array will not be as small as possible, because it does contain some type information that is used for deserialization. It's up to the individual to decide whether this suits their need. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Dec 15 '11 at 17:03
    
I just think that using a standard package i C# is better then using unsafe code. I also think it is true that when serializing the object it has to save the type information. So the byte array might be larger but the a standard solution is I think is more preferable –  Arion Dec 16 '11 at 8:49

I believe this is the equivalent to the C++/CLI pin_ptr using unsafe C# code:

    public static unsafe byte[] GetBytes(Position[] positions)
    {
        byte[] result = new byte[positions.Length * Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(Position))];
        fixed (Position* ptr = &positions[0])
        {
            Marshal.Copy((IntPtr)ptr, result, 0, result.Length);
        }
        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Is it necessary to apply the StructLayout attribute with a LayoutKind of either Sequential or Explicit to the Position struct in order to reliably use this approach? Just wondering. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Dec 15 '11 at 17:03
    
Thanks, but I can't use unsafe. I've updated the description with why. –  Adal Dec 15 '11 at 17:03
    
@Dr. Wily's Apprentice, I would definitely recommend using Explicit layout if you're going to try to interoperate with unmanaged code that's expecting a specific binary layout. I'm not sure how strong the guarantees are for automatic layout positioning. –  Dan Bryant Dec 15 '11 at 19:06

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