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I have a if statement that I want to "break" out of. I understand that break is only really for loops. Can anyone help?

For those that require an example of what I'm trying to do:

if( color == red )
{
...
if( car == hyundai ) break;
...
}

EDIT: Thanks for all your replies. It looks like I'll use a second if statement inside the first. Something like:

if( car != hyundai )
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closed as not a real question by Nawaz, Bo Persson, Kerrek SB, BЈовић, Philipp Dec 15 '11 at 21:59

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Sorry nobody can help. Voted for close. Nobody can help if you don't give us some detail with some code snippet –  Nawaz Dec 15 '11 at 16:43
    
Show the code that represents what you're trying to do. –  Matt Ball Dec 15 '11 at 16:43
2  
Can you give a little bit of sample code? And depending on the situation, you could try a switch block instead; they do support breaking. –  piebie Dec 15 '11 at 16:43
1  
If it's within a function, you could use "return". –  aoeu Dec 15 '11 at 16:44
1  
have you tried goto although it is not recommended –  Emmanuel N Dec 15 '11 at 16:44

10 Answers 10

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Nested ifs:

if (condition)
{
    // half-massive amount of code here

    if (!breakOutCondition)
    {
        //half-massive amount of code here
    }
}

At the risk of being downvoted -- it's happened to me in the past -- I'll mention that another (unpopular) option would of course be the dreaded goto; a break statement is just a goto in disguise.

And finally, I'll echo the common sentiment that your design could probably be improved so that the massive if statement is not necessary, let alone breaking out of it. At least you should be able to extract a couple of methods, and use a return:

if (condition)
{
    ExtractedMethod1();

    if (breakOutCondition)
        return;

    ExtractedMethod2();
}
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3  
Refactoring chunks into functions will not only help readability but possibly solve the original problem too. –  Mark B Dec 15 '11 at 17:10
    
Definitely in agreement with your second observation. However I would say the better path would be to refine the original condition, and add new ones as necessary, so that the block of code that is entered when it is satisfied corresponds to what should be executed before the break in OP's original idea. This would as in your example simply invoke a method, which could then be called in condition2, condition3 etc. blocks as needed. –  Matt Phillips Dec 15 '11 at 17:49
3  
goto is a fine solution if for variable scope reasons you cannot call another function. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Dec 15 '11 at 17:54
3  
goto looks a heck of a lot cleaner that nested-if after nested-if. –  Adam S Jul 15 at 23:35
1  
@AdamS That's largely true -- especially if your font size is large or your code editor window narrow. However, adding goto tends to cause a more rapid increase in the difficulty of reasoning about a routine than adding nested if statements. So in a complicated method, I would probably favor ease of understanding control flow over cleanliness. –  phoog Jul 30 at 17:10

You probably need to break up your if statement into smaller pieces. That being said, you can do two things:

  • wrap the statement into do {} while (false) and use real break (not recommended!!! huge kludge!!!)

  • put the statement into its own subroutine and use return This may be the first step to improving your code.

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3  
I've seen the do/while technique used and I wouldn't necessarily consider it a kludge it works nicely and avoids problems goto may introduce (for example attempting to jump across variable initialization) –  Nim Dec 15 '11 at 16:51
    
I'd agree it's a better solution than goto. –  Arkadiy Dec 15 '11 at 16:54
    
@phoog, probably, but I wouldn't know, the question is tagged C++, where it doesn't... –  Nim Dec 15 '11 at 16:55
    
@Nim ack, how did I miss that? –  phoog Dec 15 '11 at 16:57
    
+1, other than the extra level of indenting (which you'd have for half the code anyway with the accepted answer), this is probably ideal - it's like a controlled goto, and very close to "do what I mean" without a lot of cruft. –  Izkata Dec 15 '11 at 19:02
if (test)
{
    ...
    goto jmp;
    ...
}
jmp:

Oh why not :)

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Eww... I smell some facetiousness in this answer. Not that it's technically incorrect, of course. –  Yuck Dec 15 '11 at 17:29
5  
@Yuck Nice relevant username. As for facetiousness, well a little but I would say that if your design forces you into OPs situation to begin with, then using a goto won't make it worse. Also phoog notes in his winning answer that nested conditionals are really only superficially different. –  Matt Phillips Dec 15 '11 at 17:45

You could use a label and a goto, but this is a bad hack. You should consider moving some of the stuff in your if statement to separate methods.

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The || and && operators are short circuit, so if the left side of || evaluates to true or the left side of && evaluates to false, the right side will not be evaluated. That's equivalent to a break.

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You can't break break out of an if statement, unless you use goto.

if (true)
{
      int var = 0;
      var++;
      if (var == 1)
          goto finished;
      var++;
}

finished:
printf("var = %d\n", var);

This would give "var = 1" as output

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There's always a goto statement, but I would recommend nesting an if with an inverse of the breaking condition.

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You can use goto, return, or perhaps call abort (), exit () etc.

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Have a label at a point you want to jump to and in side your if use goto

if(condition){
     if(jumpCondition) goto label
}
label:
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I don't know your test conditions, but a good old switch could work

switch(colour)
{
  case red:
  {
    switch(car)
    { 
      case hyundai: 
      {
        break;
      }
      :
    }
    break;
  }
  :
}
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