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Assume i have an enumeration:

namespace System.Windows.Forms
{
   public enum DialogResult { None, OK, Cancel, Abort, Retry, Ignore, Yes, No }
}

i want to declare a "set" made up of these enumerated types

ShowForm(Form frm, DialogResults allowedResults)

In other languages you would declare:

public DialogResults = set of DialogResult;

And then i can use

ShowForm(frm, DialogResult.OK | DialogResult.Retry);

C# has the notion of Flags, pseudocode:

[Flags]
public enum DialogResults { DialogResult.None, DialogResult.OK, DialogResult.Cancel, DialogResult.Abort, DialogResult.Retry, DialogResult.Ignore, DialogResult.Yes, DialogResult.No }

problem with that it's not real code - Flags does not instruct the compiler to create a set of flags.

  • in one case the type should only allow one value (DialogResult)
  • in another case the type should allow multiple values of above (DialogResults)

How can i have a "set" of enumerated types?

Note: i assume it's not possible in C#. If that's the answer: it's okay to say so - the question is answered.

Note: Just because i believe C# language doesn't have the feature doesn't mean it doesn't have the feature - i may just not have found it yet.


Update: another example:

Assume i have an enumeration:

public enum PatronTier 
{ 
    Gold = 1,      
    Platinum = 2,  
    Diamond = 3,   
    SevenStar = 7  //Yes, seven
}

i want to declare a "set" made up of these enumerated types

public Tournament
{
   public PatronTiers EligibleTiers { get; set; }
}

In other languages you would declare:

public PatronTiers = set of PatronTier;

And then i can use:

tournament.EligibleTiers = PatronTier.Gold | PatronTier.SevenStar;

C# has the notion of Flags, pseudocode:

[Flags]
public enum PatronTiers { PatronTier.Gold, PatronTier.Platinum, PatronTier.Diamond, PatronTier.SevenStar }

problem with that it's not real code.

How can i have a "set" of enumerated types?

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a problem with HashSet<PatronTiers>? –  John Saunders Dec 15 '11 at 16:45
3  
public Boolean MarriageValid Hoo boy, not touching that example. :P –  Dan J Dec 15 '11 at 16:45
    
You seem to be trying to find an area between a [Flags]-based enumeration and an array or list of the enumerated type (e.g. List<PatronTier>). There is no such concept in C#, you'll need to use a collection of some kind, or use the [Flags] attribute on your enumeration. –  mjmarsh Dec 15 '11 at 16:47
1  
Missing Delphi? ;) –  vc 74 Dec 15 '11 at 16:51
2  
Do you have some kind of problem with same sex marriages? –  Jeff Dec 15 '11 at 16:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Seems like you want an array of things. There are array types in C#, but nothing that is directly equivalent to your examples in terms of compiler support, closest is perhaps DialogResults[], an array of DialogResults.

Try supplying a HashSet of the items you allow. HashSet<T> implements ISet<T>, and it's usually best to work against interfaces than concrete types, especially for method signatures:

ShowForm(Form frm, ISet<DialogResults> allowedResults);

Then you can use Contains to test for items:

if (allowedResults.Contains(DialogResults.OK))
{
}

Somewhat pointless alternative: you could always implement your own Set<Enum> type using Jon Skeet's Unconstrained Melody to give you a nicer syntax from the perspective of the caller and get a little closer to your examples.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 but the method parameter should be of type ISet<DialogResults> to permit the passing of other classes that implement ISet<DialogResults>. –  John Saunders Dec 15 '11 at 18:03
    
@JohnSaunders Didn't even realise there was an ISet<> interface, updated my answer to suit. –  Adam Houldsworth Dec 15 '11 at 18:37
    
Hmm. i had an alias that defined the type (public class PrizeEligibleTiers : HashSet<PatronTier> {};) What would be the ISet<> version of he PrizeEligibleTiers alias? –  Ian Boyd Dec 15 '11 at 19:10
    
@IanBoyd: that's not an alias, that's a derived type. Since HashSet<T> already implements ISet<T>, you would not need to change that derived class. –  John Saunders Dec 15 '11 at 19:39
    
@JohnSaunders But i would still like an alias so that i don't have to update source code when i change a type used globally (i.e. doesn't matter what PrizeEligibleTiers is, as long as it is) (Because i already have code that uses PrizeEligibleTiers and that type can keep that name, juts mean something else) –  Ian Boyd Dec 15 '11 at 20:31

I don't suppose you just mean using something like this?

var DialogResults = Enum.GetValues(typeof(DialogResult));

with a .Select(dr => (DialogResult)dr).ToArray() if you want it strongly typed.

share|improve this answer
    
with a .Cast<DialogResult>().ToArray() if you want it strongly typed. –  Scott Rippey Dec 15 '11 at 17:34

I think you want something like this:

foreach (var item in System.Enum.GetValues(typeof(PatronTier)))
{
    Console.WriteLine(item);
}
share|improve this answer

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