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I am facing an issue that I am not sure how to resolve.

I did a rebase against master from my branch:

git rebase master

and got the following error

 First, rewinding head to replay your work on top of it...
 Applying: checkstyled.
 Using index info to reconstruct a base tree...
 Falling back to patching base and 3-way merge...
 Auto-merging AssetsLoader.java
 CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in AssetsLoader.java
 Failed to merge in the changes.
 Patch failed at 0001 checkstyled.

So I went to my favourite editor, fixed the 1 line conflict, saved the file and did a git status and got the following output:

 # Not currently on any branch.
 # Changes to be committed:
 #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
 #
 #  modified:   PassengerContactHandler.java
 #
 # Unmerged paths:
 #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
 #   (use "git add/rm <file>..." as appropriate to mark resolution)
 #
 #  both modified:      AssetsLoader.java
 #

I did a git add AssetsLoader.java and a git status and got the following:

 # Not currently on any branch.
 # Changes to be committed:
 #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
 #
 #  modified:   AssetsLoader.java
 #  modified:   PassengerContactHandler.java
 #

and when I did git rebase --continue I get:

git rebase --continue
You must edit all merge conflicts and then
mark them as resolved using git add

I know I can skip the patch and continue the rebase, but I am not sure if the changes in PassengerContactHandler.java will be rebased into my branch or not.

so I am not sure, How should I proceed?

Edit: Could it be that the file with the resolved conflict is exactly like the original version?

Thanks a lot, Lucas

Edit, it just happened to me again:

It just happened to me again,

(307ac0d...)|REBASE)$ git status
# Not currently on any branch.
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   modified:   assets/world/level1/Level-1.xml
#   modified:   George.java
#   modified:   DefaultPassenger.java
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   mb-art/originalAssets/27dec/

((307ac0d...)|REBASE)$ git rebase --continue

You must edit all merge conflicts and then
mark them as resolved using git add

git --version

git version 1.7.1
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That's the full output of git status, right? No missing section below it? –  Jefromi Dec 15 '11 at 18:28
    
yes, I pasted everything... –  Lucas Dec 21 '11 at 15:59
    
git-rebase should never report that there are unresolved conflicts if there aren't any. If you can manage to reproduce the problem in a simpler test case, it'd be much easier to debug, but still, if you have git status reporting no conflicts when git rebase --continue does, and your version of Git is current, you might try emailing the Git dev mailing list at git@vger.kernel.org with as much diagnostic information as you can get. –  Jefromi Dec 21 '11 at 22:55
    
It just happened to me again, (307ac0d...)|REBASE)$ git status # Not currently on any branch. # Changes to be committed: # (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage) # # modified: assets/world/level1/Level-1.xml # modified: George.java # modified: DefaultPassenger.java # # Untracked files: # (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed) # # mb-art/originalAssets/27dec/ –  Lucas Dec 27 '11 at 21:26
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3 Answers

You missed a merge conflict in AssetsLoader.java. Open it up and look for conflict markers (">>>>", "====", "<<<<<") and then do git add again. Do a 'git diff --staged' if you're having difficulty finding it.

share|improve this answer
    
I did a grep on all the tracked files and there were no conflict markers. –  Lucas Dec 15 '11 at 17:09
    
Does git diff --staged reveal anything useful? This indicates which changes you are about to commit to resolve the merge conflict(s) at this point in the rebase. There should be an "oops, that's not what I intended to do to resolve this" bit in one of the files. –  Ether Dec 15 '11 at 17:14
2  
Git doesn't look for merge conflict markers when you try to move on. It just checks to see that the index is in a clean state. If you staged a file that still has conflict markers in it, you're indicating that you want to commit it with them in it. It's probably always a mistake, but it'll let you do it. –  Jefromi Dec 15 '11 at 18:27
    
@Ether this is not the reason at all. You can git add a file even with conflict markers in it. After all, such files may be perfectly legal! –  fge Dec 15 '11 at 18:50
    
@Jefromi: a ha, good to know! I always assumed that the markers were checked for, and one would need to --force past it if it were intentional. –  Ether Dec 15 '11 at 19:25
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Ive just had this problem, and whilst I think there might be a few causes, here's mine...

I had a git pre-commit hook which rejected commits under certain conditions. This is fine when committing manually, since it will display the output of the hook, and I can either fix it or choose to ignore it using commit --no-verify.

The problem seems to be that when rebasing, rebase --continue will also call the hook (in order to commit the lastest bout of changes). But rebase will not display the hook output, it'll just see that it failed, and then spit out a less specific error saying 'You must edit all merge conflicts and then mark them as resolved using git add'

To fix it, stage all your changes, and instead of doing 'git rebase --continue', try a 'git commit'. If you are suffering from the same hook problem, you should then see the reasons why its failing.

Interestingly, whilst git rebase doesn't display the output from git hook, it does accept a --no-verify to bypass the hooks.

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I had a similar problem. Nothing else here worked for me, but just doing 'git commit' and then aborting seemed to magically resolve whatever the discrepancy there was, and then I was able to 'git rebase --continue' successfully. –  patrickvacek Aug 6 '12 at 20:11
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Try running this in your command line:

$ git mergetool

Should bring up an interactive editor allowing you to resolve the conflicts. Easier than trying to do it manually, and also git will recognize when you do the merge. Will also avoid situations where you don't fully merge by accident that can happen when you try to do it manually.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, I know the tool but I'd rather do it manually. –  Lucas Dec 15 '11 at 17:10
    
Just figured it might be easier and also would allow you to avoid situations like this in the future. –  Batkins Dec 15 '11 at 17:12
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