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I would like to set the vertical alignment of the label in the header of my JTable-derrived class.

I am aware of setVerticalAlignment(SwingConstants.BOTTOM);

My header is much higher than the font and I would like to place the text slightly below the vertical centre.

How can I do this, without overriding paint() ?

THX

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that's not possible, the layout of a JLabel is rather fixed. What you might try is setting an invisible icon of appropriate size and set the text position to be below the icon. Beware: that'll clash with sort markers, as most LAFs use the icon as such. –  kleopatra Dec 16 '11 at 10:03
    
forgot the usual for unusual requirements: why? –  kleopatra Dec 16 '11 at 10:04
1  
Because attention to such tiny details make things looks better. Sometimes you need to think like a graphic designer, not a programmer :) –  Adam Dec 16 '11 at 10:41
    
then you'll probably end writing an entire LAF :-) Or find one, commercial or free, there are several looking quite polished - with attention to detail –  kleopatra Dec 16 '11 at 10:45
    
BTW, what is your target LAF? –  kleopatra Dec 16 '11 at 10:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

one of ways is to set Renderer, TableHeader by default returns JLabel, for example

  final TableCellRenderer tcrOs = myTable.getTableHeader().getDefaultRenderer();
       myTable.getTableHeader().setDefaultRenderer(new TableCellRenderer() {

            @Override
            public Component getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table, 
                   Object value, boolean isSelected, boolean hasFocus, 
                   int row, int column) {
                JLabel lbl = (JLabel) tcrOs.getTableCellRendererComponent(table, 
                      value, isSelected, hasFocus, row, column);
                lbl.setForeground(AppVariables.textColor);
                lbl.setBorder(BorderFactory.createCompoundBorder(lbl.getBorder(), 
                      BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(0, 5, 0, 0)));
                lbl.setHorizontalAlignment(SwingConstants.LEFT);
                if (isSelected) {
                    lbl.setForeground(Color.red);
                    lbl.setBackground(Color.lightGray);
                } else {
                    lbl.setForeground(Color.blue);
                    lbl.setBackground(Color.black);
                }
                return lbl;
            }
        });
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random code, unrelated to the question –  kleopatra Dec 16 '11 at 9:58
1  
Thanks mKobel! kleo it IS related. The trick I needed is burried in there. All I needed was: setBorder(BorderFactory.createCompoundBorder(getBorder(), BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(6, 0, 0, 0))); –  Adam Dec 16 '11 at 10:52
    
glad to help +1 –  mKorbel Dec 16 '11 at 10:55
    
okay, I stand corrected, actually overlooked that line in all the clutter ;-) –  kleopatra Dec 16 '11 at 10:58
1  
Still a lot of random code to simply add a Border to a renderer. Sometimes it is hard to see the tree through the forest because you always add so much unnecessary code. –  camickr Dec 16 '11 at 16:33
JTableHeader header = table.getTableHeader();
TableCellRenderer renderer = header.getDefaultRenderer();
renderer.setVerticalAlignment(SwingConstants.BOTTOM);
share|improve this answer
1  
This is NOT an answer to my question. Read the question more carefully. –  Adam Dec 16 '11 at 10:38
    
@Adam, I read the question 3 times. I still posted what I thought was the answer you where looking for. Usually I can read read between the lines for a poorly worded question, but I guess not this time. Next time post a proper SSCCE so we don't have to guess. –  camickr Dec 16 '11 at 16:34

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